Show of 3-6-2010

  • Email and Forum Questions
    • Email from JP: Hey Doc., I really enjoy your show & I’ve been listening via podcast download for a couple of months now. I was wondering if you had some way to search through all 10 years of your download library to find specific topics of interested. I know you have a description of each show, unless it is a repeat of an old show, but that’s a lot to search through.
    • Also, I’d like to know how to block some new junk text messages I have been getting lately on my razor? Is it a good idea to reply for them to “stop”? My provider is AT&T
    • PS: you said you like Pandora, I also like Grooveshark until my IT Department. shut down all streaming. Thanks, JP (Arkansas)
    • Tech Talk Answers: JP, we don’t have a specific search function for Tech Talk. However, you can use Google advanced search to get what you want. Simply use this search string: “Search phrase” "tech talk" site:stratford.edu.
    • You can block most text message spam. AT&T allows you control your texting. Go to your Personal Preferences page on the AT&T wireless site. You have several options to block text messages. Your choices are to:
      • Block text messages sent as email (from email accounts)
      • Block all multimedia messages send as email
      • Block all messages sent from mobile numbers
      • Block messages sent from specific email accounts or domains
      • Allow all messages sent from specific email accounts or domains
    • As far as streaming at work, I don’t blame IT for blocking Grooveshark. Streaming is a bandwidth hog. We block it too at Stratford.
    • Email from Robert Taylor: Dear Techtalk Radio: My daughter in law recently got a virus by clicking on a popup which claimed to be a security program which detected a virus on her computer. When she clicked on it the hidden program ran an executable file that infected her computer with a terrible rootkit virus. She finally got rid of the virus via Dell tech support. The question I have is could she have used the system restore point feature in Windows 7 to go back to an earlier date to clear this problem up? Are rootkits hard to get rid of if you don’t wipe the drive?
    • Thank you for a very informative podcast. I am a commercial fisherman on the Chesapeake Bay and listen to your show and previous shows through the Itunes podcast download when I’m going to and from the fishing grounds. Robert Tyler
    • Tech Talk Answers: A system restore will not get rid of a rootkit because they intercept all system commands and protect themselves. You need a rootkit removal tool that looks for rootkit masking behavior. Sophos has a free anti-rootkit removal tool that can be downloaded. Just Google and you can get the address.
    • Email from Lynn: Dear Dr. Richard Shurtz, I work as a tech writer in No VA and need to learn how to build Macros in WORD ’07. I have bought several books on WORD 07 but they are not detailed enough to enable me to master doing this. I work with really lengthy documents and I need to be working smarter soon or I’ll never keep up with my workload. It is my hope that you know of some really good website that some Guru has created on WORD 07 where I can find heavy users of WORD and chat and learn from them. The life of a tech writer can get rather lonely and there is no one at my job doing this work but me. Thanks, Lynn
    • Tech Talk Answers: Lynn, take a deep breath. Macros are easy to create in MS Office products. You can simply use the record function to create a macro. Go to Tools/Macro/Record New Macro. Then simply do the things that you want to automate with a macro. Word will create a Visual Basic script as you do the operations. When you are finished, simply name and save the Macro. You can then open the Macro using the Visual Basic Script Editor and you can see the commands that were created. Viewing a finished script is actually one of the best ways to learn a new language. Also, don’t forget to view the many build-in macros within Word. You may already have what you want.
  • Profiles in IT: Edward E. Iacobucci
    • Edward E. Iacobucci is founder and visionary of Citrix Systems, a pioneer in the development of thin client software.
    • Edward Iacobucci attended high school in Atlanta, Georgia.
    • He received a BS from the Georgia Institute of Technology.
    • He went to work for IBM in 1978.
    • Iacobucci became acquainted with Bill Gates when the two worked together on a joint IBM/Microsoft project to develop the operating system known as OS/2.
    • By 1989, Iacobucci had decided to leave IBM and Gates offered him a job at Microsoft as chief technical officer of its networking group.
    • Iacobucci instead gathered $3 million capital to start Citrix.
    • Citrix was originally named Citrus but changed its name after an existing company claimed trademark rights. The Citrix name is a portmanteau of Citrus and UNIX.
    • His vision was to run sophisticated software from simple devices. He envisioned “thin” machines as an “information devices” as opposed to a conventional computer.
    • Iacobucci first set up Citrix in Richardson, Texas, but moved back to Coral Springs, Florida, where he had been living while working for IBM.
    • The company began with five engineers, who also left IBM’s Florida offices.
    • Citrix spent two years developing Citrix Multiuser OS/2.
    • It would let more than one worker at a time tap into the operating system.
    • The company went through a second round of financing, another $3 million in 1990.
    • Just days before Citrix was prepared to ship Multiuser in 1991, Microsoft announced that it would drop OS/2 in favor of its new operating system, Windows.
    • This was bad news for Citrix. Multiuser was virtually useless.
    • Iacobucci was certain that the company’s engineers could make a Windows version of Multiuser, if only Citrix could get more financing.
    • The company raised another $5 million to keep it afloat.
    • Intel was one big new investor, and another was Microsoft (with 6 to 7 percent)
    • In 1993, Citrix introduced WinView, which provided remote access to DOS and Windows 3.1 applications on a multi-user platform. Citrix’s first success.
    • The company went public in December 1995.
    • Citrix obtained a source code license to Microsoft’s Windows NT 3.51.
    • In 1995, they shipped a multiuser version of WinNT with remote access (WinFrame).
    • This product was a unique offering targeting the needs of large enterprises, and enabled the company to become more profitable.
    • During the development of WinFrame for Windows NT 4, Microsoft decided that it did not want to license Windows NT 4 source code to Citrix.
    • After negotiations, Microsoft agreed to license Citrix technology for Windows NT Server 4.0, resulting in Windows Terminal Server Edition.
    • Citrix agreed not to ship a competing product but retained the right to sell an extension to Microsoft’s products, initially under the name MetaFrame.
    • In 1998, he was named the National E & Y Entrepreneur Of The Year®.
    • He left Citix in 2000 and two years later founded DayJet to provide direct, on-demand jet service. DayJet ceased operations in 2008.
  • Viral Video Week: A Brief History of Pretty Much Everything
    • This video carries the viewer from the creation of the universe to man leaving Earth to explore that universe.
    • Along the way, the flipbook-style animation retells evolution, the rise of civilizations, and the theory of relativity.
    • It was made by 17 year-old Jamie Bell from the UK.
    • Jamie drew and filmed the project for art class.
    • It 2100 pages contained in about 50 jotter books.
    • He worked on it on-and-off for about three weeks.
    • The YouTube clip has attracted more than 1 million viewers.
    • Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gNYZH9kuaYM
  • Twitters 10 Billions Tweet
    • A major milestone was reached on March 4, 2010.
    • The 10 billionth tweet was sent when someone hit the update button.
    • Who was it and what did they say?
    • It appears that the landmark tweet was posted by someone who has set their feed to be private by default.
    • A search for tweet No. 10 billion – individual posts on the site are identified by a number – yields a message saying that page is unavailable.
    • The two nearest misses, however, were public and show the range of ways the micro-blogging site is used.
    • Tweet number 9,999,999,999 was by a user with the handle @lelamarques, who posted a link to a gallery of “urban decay” photographs – a genre that celebrates the hidden beauty of abandoned buildings.
    • But tweet Number 10,000,000,001 is from a woman who says she lives in Bronx, New York, the tweet read simply, “$Pretty N Paid$.” Her feed is filled with profanity and misspelled words, often written in all caps. Since Friday morning, that user has switched her feed to private.
    • Twitter saw its 1 billionth tweet about a year ago and hit 5 billion tweets about four months ago.
  • Auto-Captioning on YouTube
    • YouTube on Thursday opened its previously restricted automated captioning beta program to the public, saying it will help the hearing-impaired.
    • Currently, the feature is only available for videos that contain speech in the English language.
    • Video uploaders can use a feature that translates captions in English into any of 50 languages.
    • Auto-captioning feature might help YouTube monetize its videos.
    • In November of 2009, it launched a limited beta of the auto-captioning feature.
    • By the end of this year, YouTube will have millions of videos that are auto-captioned,
    • About 20 hours of video are uploaded to YouTube every minute.
    • Only the owner of a video can request auto-captions.
    • Video owners can download auto-captions for a video by signing into their account.
    • YouTube has not made money so far — it’s expected to have lost about US$470 million in 2009, although Google doesn’t include figures for the service in its earnings reports.
    • Auto-captioning may help Google monetize the service.
  • FBI to Higher Cybersecurity Experts
    • FBI Director Robert Mueller spoke at the RSA Conference 2010 this week.
    • The FBI is seeking to hire cybersecurity experts from the private sector.
    • The FBI has cybersquads in each of its 56 fields nationwide, and more than 1,000 specially trained agents, analysts and digital forensic examiners who run complex undercover operations.
    • It also has mobile cyberaction teams — agents, analysts and experts highly trained in both computer forensics and malicious code — who travel worldwide to respond to fast-moving cyberthreats.
    • It has created and leads the National Cyber Investigative Joint Task Force, which combines 17 law enforcement and intelligence agencies to predict what’s on the horizon and to prevent attacks.
    • Without support from the private sector, law enforcement will find it difficult to fight cybercrime, Mueller said.
    • "We need your help, so let me emphasize the importance of private sector partnerships," he told his audience.
    • Mueller pledged that the FBI will minimize disruption to companies that report crimes.
    • The FBI has more than 60 attachés based in nations around the globe who share information and intelligence with their host countries, Mueller pointed out.
    • Cooperation between the FBI and Spanish authorities helped crack the Mariposa botnet and take down the three men behind it.
    • The FBI has also cooperated with Egyptian authorities to dismantle an intrusion and money-laundering scheme, and with German and other authorities to dismantle "Dark Market," one of the largest underground markets for stolen cyber information.
  • Stratford University in India
    • Bachelor and Masters Degrees
    • IT, Business, Hospitality, Allied Health
    • Integrates critical thinking in the classroom
    • Seeking students with innovative potential via $1M scholarship program
    • Campus website in India: http://www.modistratford.in
    • Website for scholarship program: http://www.innovationu.in