Show of 5-24-2008

  • Tech Talk Guests
    • Dr. James Flaggert, Dean, Graduate School and COO, Stratford University
    • Professor Prem Jadhwani, Stratford University
  • Live Report from Beijing
    • Dr. Shurtz is reporting live from Beijing China
    • He is using a voice over IP connection (Skype) to make the call.
    • Dr. Shurtz was in both Xi’an and Beijing, China
  • Profiles in IT: Liu Dong
    • Leader in deployment of and policy development for IPv6 in China
    • Graduated from Beijing University with an economics major
    • Since 1994 he has made an influential contribution to the development of China’s telecom and Internet sectors.
    • As a senior representative of China Internet industry Liu Dong is actively involved in telecommunication domestic policy, serves as a member of the advisory team representing the Chinese government at ICANN and other global forums, and is a well known speaker at international conferences and seminars.
    • Among his current projects, Liu Dong is devoting himself to the construction and operating of NGN— the first commercial IPv6 test-bed network in China.
    • In 1995 he founded Beijing Internet Institute (BII)
      • He currently serves as President and CEO
      • BII First private research institute focusing on IT and Telecom in China
      • BII develops policy, regulatory and technical studies for the Chinese Ministry of Information Industry (MII) Telecom Administration Bureau
      • BII serves as China’s delegate to Internet bodies such as ICANN and IETF
    • In 1999, he founded the BII Group
      • He currently serves as President and CEO
      • BII Group is the 1st IPv6 solution provider’
      • BII Group has the largest IPv6 R&D facility in China.
      • BII Group is focused on the deployment IPv6-based next generation Internet
      • BII Group also is aimed at deployment of Next Gen IP Telecomm Networks
    • Other activities
      • Board Member & Fellow of the IPv6 Forum
      • President of IPv6 Forum of China
      • Founder and Board, China Internet Society
      • Member, Telecom Law Committee, State Council
      • Member, Digital Signature Law Committee, State Council
      • Deputy Director, Beijing Telecom Information Society
      • Initiator and Core Member, China P2P Promoting Alliance
      • Founder & Chair, Global WiMAX Summit (2005-2007) which focuses on pooint-to-point wireless networks
      • Founder & Chair, Global IPv6 Summit (2002-2007)
      • Founder & Chair, Global WiMedia Summit (2005-2007) which focuses on standards for Ultra-Wide Band (UWB) Personal Area Networks
    • Rarely is someone so involved, both politically and technically. Expect his efforts to give China a real advantage in IPv6 technology and applications
  • Chinese IPv6 Deployment
    • Chinese government plans to unveil at the Olympics: China’s Next Generation Internet (CNGI), a faster, more secure, more mobile version of the current one.
    • CNGI is the centerpiece of China’s plan to steal leadership away from the United States in all things Internet and information technology.
    • The strategy, outlined in China’s latest five-year plan, calls for the country to transition its economy from one based almost entirely on manufacturing to one that produces its own scientific and technological breakthroughs?using a new and improved version of today’s dominant innovation platform, the Internet.
    • "CNGI is the culmination of this revolutionary plan" to turn China into the world’s innovation capital.
    • The technology at the heart of CNGI is an emerging communication standard called Internet protocol version 6 (IPv6).
      • CNGI connects 100 universities, 100 research institutes and 100 companies in 20 cities.
      • At the Beijing Olympics, China plans to use CNGI for everything from broadcasting the events to controlling the Olympic facilities.
    • China is betting that by moving to the next-generation Internet before the rest of the world, China’s researchers, academics and entrepreneurs will be the first ones to develop applications and services that take advantage of the new capabilities.
    • The innovation potential provided by IPv6 is enormous.
      • The development of the next-generation Internet will boost information infrastructure construction, network equipment manufacturing, the software industry and the information service industry.
      • Every device, from cell phones and streetlights to household thermostat, can have its own unique position on the Internet and be connected all the time.
      • Furthermore, since every computer will have its own permanent IP address, users will be able to authenticate the source of emails or other requests, providing the means to track and prevent today’s hacking, spam and phishing schemes.
    • Researchers and entrepreneurs are busy developing applications and services that take advantage of the new capabilities, hoping to get a head start on the commercialization of these services.
    • The United States’ reluctance to invest in IPv6 makes it more likely that China will be in a position to gain the first-mover advantage it seeks.
    • China wants to be the next Silicon Valley and they feel IPv6 is the ticket. China is looking for the next IPv6 killer application.
  • Olympic Tech Update: IPv6 Networked Applications
    • Beijing Internet Institute (BII), one of China’s premier IPv6 research and development firms, has been leading a couple of IPv6 projects for the 2008 Olympics.
      • One is the surveillance system ? the security cameras and such ? to be used throughout the Olympic venues. These will all run over IPv6.
      • The other project, developed in partnership with China Netcom and Panasonic, is an IPv6-based intelligent lighting control system.
      • Taxis in Beijing will be monitored by CNGI via IPv6 GPS sensors so that traffic congestion can be quickly and effectively relieved.
    • Liu Dong, BII’s CEO, tells me that the experience gained from projects such as these will expand to larger projects such as IPv6-enabled energy control systems that can help reduce energy use in buildings throughout China.
    • These are closed systems that provide the opportunity to gain strong experience in IPv6 deployment and operations before tackling the issues of IPv4/IPv6 interoperability.
  • Olympic Tech Update: RFID Chips Will Be Placed In Olympic Tickets
    • According to Beijing Municipal Science and Technology Commission, a total of more than 16 million tickets embedded with RFID chips will be used during the Beijing Olympic Games.
    • This is the first time that RFID has ever been used for the Olympic Games.
    • Developed by Tsinghua University and Beijing Tsinghua Tongfang Microelectronics Company, the RFID chip features a minimum size of 0.3 square millimeter and 50 microns in thickness.
    • It can be embedded into paper and can be used to identify goods from about five meters away.
    • Due to its high tech features, it is difficult for the chip to be fabricated, hence it effectively also prevents the occurrence of fake door tickets and simplifies the ticket checking procedure.
    • In addition, the chip reportedly has a good memory on such information as when and where a ticket holder buys the ticket and where the holder’s seat is located.
  • The Great Firewall of China
    • The official name for the Great Firewall of China is the ?Golden Shield Project.
      • The Golden Shield Project is operated by Ministry of Public Security of the People’s Republic of China (MPS).
      • It started in 1998, began filtering in November of 2003;.
    • The Chinese Internet has three choke points
      • Beijing-Qingdao-Tianjin area in the north, where cables come in from Japan
      • Shanghai on the central coast, where they also come from Japan
      • Guangzhou in the south, where they come from Hong Kong.
    • Chinese monitor and block Internet traffic in four ways.
      • DNS block for banned sites
      • Connection Reset for banned IP addresses
      • Response loops for URLs that contain banned keywords
      • Connection reset for banned keywords in actual web pages
    • Temporary blackouts are used for recurring attempts. If a user attracts official attention because of too many ?bad searches,? he may be subject to criminal action.
    • These ?international gateways? mirror every packet of data going in or out.
      • As packets travel through the routers, they are mirrored to a separate set of ?Golden Shield? computers for further review.
      • China’s ?Golden Shield? surveillance computers are looking to see whether the packet stream should be stopped.
      • The mirroring routers were first designed and supplied to the Chinese authorities by the U.S. tech firm Cisco, which is why Cisco took such heat from human-rights organizations.
    • Anyone in China who wants to get around the firewall can choose between two well-known and dependable alternatives: the proxy server and the VPN.
    • Free proxies can be slow and VPNs can be expensive for the average Chinese worker.
    • VPNs are advertised in China for about $40 per year.
    • Chinese bloggers have learned that if they want to be read in China, they must operate within China, on the same side of the firewall as their potential audience.
    • Large teams of paid government censors delete offensive comments and warn errant bloggers.
  • Chinese Earthquake and Technology
    • Bloggers report use of improper use of relief supplies
    • Traditional media carries the story and authorities respond
    • YouTube videos show plight of victims near real time
    • One teenage girl curses victims because of three day entertainment blackout on YouTube creating a national response.
    • Internet makes the whole situation transparent
    • Chinese apparently authorities do not restrict flow of information