Show of 05-13-2017

Tech Talk Radio
Encore Presentation
May 13, 2017

Best of Tech Talk Edition

  • Segments replayed from previous shows

Email and Forum Questions

  • Email from Doug in Baton Rouge: Dear Dr. Shurtz and Jim, As usual, great and wonderfully weekly shows; as they are full of information and interesting historical reviews of relevant people that contributed to the computer world.
  • I am not sure that 100% of my emails are getting to my recipients. When I send out an email, I flag the delivered message to Return-a-Delivery-Request notice. Some of my emails do get replies and others just never get any responses. I am sure that I have the email addresses correctly entered and there are no bounce-backs of incorrect address notices. My IP is through AT&T and the security suite offered by them is McAfee. I use Windows-10 and Microsoft Outlook as my proxy email program.
  • The majority of my correspondences are to businesses that provide services or where I am seeking information on their products. Even when I send in a message through their website messaging page, even those are not getting through as well. I went by a local vendor to whom I sent an inquiry through their website and I asked if they received it. They informed me that they did not. Nor did the salesperson receive another email I sent direct to his mailbox. What is going on with my email problems? Thanks, Doug in Baton Rouge, LA
  • Tech Talk Responds: I would send an email to another email account that I own, like Gmail to test whether the emails are getting out. Or to a family member.
  • If emails are not getting out, I would check your outbox to see if any messages are unsent. If you have a message with a very large attachment, it may the problem. Check your sent directory to see if the message in question was sent. Have you recently changed your password? Some outgoing mail servers require a password.
  • Remember that the recipient of your email may choose not to send a Receipt Notice back to you. It is optional. I have turned that option off in my email client for privacy purposes.
  • Here are the steps to troubleshooting Outlook
    • Outlook allows you to work in either offline or online mode. If your mail is still sitting in your outbox and hasn’t been sent, then check your status to ensure you are working in online mode.
    • An address conflict between your email address and the saved address can be the cause of the mail remaining unsent. If the address is not in the address book then add the email address to your address book. This often helps to get that stubborn email sent.
    • Make sure the send options in your Microsoft Outlook are correct by following the steps. Open Outlook, Click the “Tools” tab, Select the “Mail Setup” tab, Ensure that the “Send Immediately” option is checked, Go back into your outbox folder, open the mail and click “send” again.
    • If the above fixes haven’t worked then the problem may be caused by a damaged outbox folder. To create a new outbox folder, or any other standard folder in Outlook, exit the program and then use windows explorer to search for the outbox folder outbox.dbf. Delete this file on your computer. Note that any unsent mail will be lost. When you re-enter Outlook. Outlook will create a new Outbox folder.
    • The final fix you can try is to set up a new mail profile. Make sure you close your Outlook application and then click your start button and select “Control Panel”. Select the Mail or Mail and Fax icons and then click on “Show Profiles”: Select “Add” to add a new profile, Follow the instructions to set up a new mail profile, Start Outlook and try to send you email again.
  • Email from Jean: Listen to your program via podcast and enjoy learning about all the gadgets that become available. Have just been reading about spherical cameras and would like to hear a discussion about them and the advantages that they give photographers. Thanks, Jean
  • Tech Talk Responds: In photography, an omnidirectional camera (from “omni”, meaning all) is a camera with a 360-degree field of view in the horizontal plane, or with a visual field that covers (approximately) the entire sphere. Omnidirectional cameras are important in areas where large visual field coverage is needed, such as in panoramic photography, robotics, and virtual reality.
  • The first wave of 360-degree cameras has arrived, and they let you record everything going on around you at once. If you have a VR headset, such as the Gear VR or Google Cardboard, experience virtual reality and really feel as if you were there. Or you can just watch 360 clips on your phone or laptop after uploading them to YouTube or Facebook.
  • Tom’s Hardware Guide testes several of the 360 cameras and evaluated them on video quality, field of view, water resistance, ease of use and other factors.
  • Their top pick was 360fly 4K ($499).Although it doesn’t take a full 360-degree image in every direction, its image quality was among the best, it was easy to use, and its app was the most full-featured. Their favorite budget model is the LG 360cam ($199), which doesn’t take as good a picture, but is easy to use, and can slide smoothly into your pocket.
  • Surprisingly, of the cameras they tested, only a few of them, including the Giroptic, LG360 and Samsung Gear 360, actually recorded a true spherical image, or something very close to it. The others could record 360 degrees only in one direction. The result is that, when you’re panning around the final video, there’s a large black section (usually at the bottom), which takes away somewhat from a truly immersive experience, especially in VR. A 240 degree fisheye lens is a typical. You have to turn it for a full 360 and that requires stitching. Two back-to-back 180 degree FOV will provide a full 360, but it also requires stitching. They all require a smart phone for the final processing.
  • Email from Ngoc in Ohio: Dear Tech Talk. I all recently got a new iPhone and I lost all my photos in the process. I know that they were backed on the iCloud. What can I do. Love the podcast here in Ohio, Ngoc.
  • Tech Talk Responds: If you have created an iPhone backup with iTunes or iCloud, you have a big chance to get back your disappeared pictures by restoring your iPhone from the backup. But you should know that your iPhone data would be erased and replaced by backup data in this method. If you have taken lots of pictures since you got you new phone this may not be a good option.
  • If you don’t want to erase all data and settings on iPhone to restore disappeared pictures, you can use iPhone backup viewing tools like PhoneRescue to check whether there are some missing photos on iTunes/iCloud backup. And if there are, extract them from backup.
  • Download and install PhoneRescue to your computer.
  • Connect your iPhone to computer with USB cable.
  • Run PhoneRescue on your computer, choose “Recover from iTunes Backup” and click “Next” button on the bottom right corner.
  • Select your iPhone backup and click Next.
  • You can click “Compare” to get only the differences between your iPhone and the backup.
  • After Scan, click Photos on the left panel to preview all photos. Select the items you want to extract, and then click To Computer to extract selected pictures to your computer.
  • Email from June in Burke: Dear Doc and Jim, I got lost in your description of quantum computing last week. What is it actually good for? I could not figure that out. Love the show. June in Burke
  • Tech Talk Responds: The biggest and most important one is the ability to factorise a very large number into two prime numbers. That’s really important because that’s what almost all encryption for internet computing is based on. A quantum computer should be able to do that relatively quickly to get back the prime numbers and that will mean that basically anything that has been with [that] encryption can be de-encrypted. If you were to do it with the classical computers we have now, it would take longer than the age of the universe to go back.
  • Another application is calculating the positions of individual atoms in very large molecules like polymers and in viruses. The way that the particles interact with each other. So if you have a quantum computer you could use it to develop drugs and understand how molecules work a bit better.
  • Why is it faster? A normal computer has bits and each bit [is either] zero or one. A quantum computer has quantum bits. These are made out of quantum particles that can be zero, one, or some kind of state in between. In other words they can have both values at the same time. A quantum bit in a quantum computer could be a photon, an electron, an ion, or some other quantum particle.
  • In a normal computer, a particular calculation might go through all the different possibilities of zeros and ones for a particular calculation. Because a quantum computer can be in all the states at the same time, you just do one calculation [testing a vast number of possibilities simultaneously]. So it can be much quicker

Profiles in IT: James T. Russell

  • The digital compact disc was invented in the late 1960s by James T. Russell.
  • Russell was born in Bremerton, Washington in 1931.
  • At age six, he invented a remote-control battleship, with a storage chamber for his lunch.
  • Russell went on to earn a BA in Physics from Reed College in Portland in 1953.
  • He went to work as a Physicist in General Electric’s in Richland, Washington.
  • He was among the first to use a color TV screen and keyboard as the sole interface between computer and operator. He designed and built the first electron beam welder.
  • In 1965, he joined Battelle Memorial Institute’s Pacific Northwest Laboratory in Richland, Washington. He title was Senior Scientist.
  • Russell was an avid music listener. He was continually frustrated by the wear and tear suffered by his vinyl phonograph records.
  • Alone at home one Saturday, Russell began to sketch out a music recording system, which could record and replay without physical contact using only light.
  • He saw that if he could represent the binary 0 and 1 with dark and light, a device could read sounds or indeed any information at all without ever wearing out. Battelle let Russell pursue the project.
  • After years of work, Russell succeeded in inventing the first digital-to-optical recording and playback system (patented in 1970).
  • He had found a way to record onto a photosensitive platter in tiny "bits" of light and dark, each one micron in diameter; a laser read the binary patterns, and a computer converted the data into an electronic signal — which it was then comparatively simple to convert into an audible or visible transmission.
  • This was the first compact disc.
  • Although Russell had once envisioned 3×5-inch stereo records that would fit in a shirt pocket and a video record that would be about the size of a punch card, the final product imitated the phonographic disc which had been its inspiration.
  • Through the 1970s, Russell continued to refine the CD-ROM, adapting it to any form of data.
  • Like many ideas far ahead of their time, the CD-ROM found few interested investors at first; but eventually, Sony and other audio companies realized the implications and purchased licenses.
  • By 1985, Russell had earned 26 patents for CD-ROM technology.
  • He then founded his own consulting firm, where he has continued to create and patent improvements in optical storage systems, along with bar code scanners, liquid crystal shutters, and other industrial optical instruments.
  • His most revolutionary recent invention is a high-speed optical data recorder / player that has no moving parts. Russell earned another 11 patents for this "Optical Random Access Memory" device, which is currently being refined for the market.

Food Science — Mother Sauces

  • Culinary Moves from Italy to France
    • Culinary tradition moved from Italy to France in the 16th century.
    • Catherine de Medici, niece of the Magnificent, took a multitude of cooks and their helpers to Paris when she married, at age 14, Henry of Orleans, the future Henry II in 1533.
  • The Mother Sauces
    • The five mother sauces as designated by Escoffier were bechamel, veloute, hollandaise, espagnole, and tomato.
    • Béchamel, the classic white sauce, was named after its inventor, Louis XIV’s steward Louis de Béchamel. The king of all sauces, it is often referred to as a cream sauce because of its appearance and is probably used most frequently in all types of dishes. Made by stirring milk into a butter-flour roux, the thickness of the sauce depends on the proportion of flour and butter to milk.
    • Velouté is a stock-based white sauce. It can be made from chicken, veal or fish stock. Enrichments such as egg yolks or cream are sometimes also added.
    • Espagnole, or brown sauce, is traditionally made of a rich meat stock, a mirepoix of browned vegetables (most often a mixture of diced onion, carrots and celery), a nicely browned roux, herbs and sometimes tomato paste.
    • Hollandaiseis made with an emulsion of egg yolks and fat. Hollandaise is made with butter, egg yolks and lemon juice, usually in a double boiler to prevent overheating, and served warm. It’s also used as the base for such mixtures as Tartar Sauce, Thousand Island Dressing, Aïoli, and Remoulade.
    • This is self-explanatory.
  • Some chefs add a sixth sauce to the list.
    • Sometimes this sixth one is added to the list. Vinagrette is a sauce made of a simple blend of oil, vinegar, salt and pepper (usually 3 parts oil to 1 part vinegar).

Idea of the Week: Speech-Jamming Gun

  • Two Japanese researchers recently introduced a prototype for a device they call a SpeechJammer that can literally “jam” someone’s voice — effectively stopping them from talking. Now they’ve released a video of the device in action.
  • The researchers released the video after their paper went viral Thursday, to the authors’ apparent surprise.
  • The design of the device is deceptively simple. It consists of a direction-sensitive microphone and a direction-sensitive speaker, a motherboard, a distance sensor and some relatively straightforward code. The concept is simple, too — it operates on the well-studied principle of delayed auditory feedback.
  • By playing someone’s voice back to them, at a slight delay (around 200 milliseconds), you can jam a person’s speech.
  • The Japanese researchers behind the SpeechJammer looked to medical devices used to help people with speech problems.
  • Delayed auditory feedback, or DAF, devices have been used to help stutterers for decades. If a stutterer hears his own voice at a slight delay, stuttering often improves.
  • But if a non-stutterer uses a DAF device designed to help stutterers, he can start stuttering — and the effect is more pronounced if the delay is longer.
  • They utilized DAF to develop a device that can jam remote physically unimpaired people’s speech whether they want it or not.
  • Being at a distance from the target means it’s possible to aim the device at people who are several feet away.
  • Bothered by what someone at a meeting is saying? Point the SpeechJammer at him.
  • The device is still a prototype.

Facebook Profile Used to Predict Job Performance

  • Your Facebook page provides a clue as to who you are.
  • Other things a prospective employer might be able to glean from your Facebook profile is openness to new experiences (vacation pictures from a glacier off New Zealand), emotional stability (are your friends constantly offering you words of comfort?) and agreeableness (are you constantly arguing with “friends?”).
  • In a series of two studies conducted by researchers at Northern Illinois University, the University of Evansville and Auburn University, six people with experience in human resources were asked to rate a sample of 500 people in terms of key personality traits using only the sample group’s Facebook pages as a guideline.
  • The raters were told to spend roughly five to 10 minutes with each person’s Facebook page, and work on the project for no longer than one and a half hours per day to avoid fatigue.
  • They were asked to rate members of the sample group on what is known as the “Big Five” personality traits:
  • Extroversion
  • Conscientiousness
  • Emotional stability
  • Agreeableness
  • Openness to new experiences.
  • High scores on these traits are generally accepted by human resources managers as an indication of future good job performance.
  • Members of the sample group were asked to give a self-evaluation and took an IQ test.
  • In one study, researchers followed up with the employers of people in the sample group six months after their personality traits were rated, to ask questions about job performance.
  • The researchers found that the raters were generally in agreement about the personality traits expressed in the sample group’s Facebook page, and that their ratings correlated strongly with self-rated personality traits.
  • More importantly, they also found that the Facebook ratings were a more accurate way of predicting a person’s job performance than an IQ test.
  • Employers beware: A Facebook page can provide a lot of information that it would be illegal for an employer to ask of a candidate in a phone interview.
  • A 2011 study conducted by the social media service Reppler found that 90 percent of recruiters and hiring managers look at an applicant’s Facebook page whether they should or not.

Top 5 Things Entrepreneurs Can Learn from Albert “Bad Boy” Einstein

  • Source:http://www.esoupblog.com
  • It seems like every field planet has a resident “bad boy”. It doesn’t matter if the occupation is figure skating or physics, there is always someone who doesn’t quite fit in.
  • Albert Einstein was the “bad boy” of the science world. He was an outsider in his younger years, a misunderstood genius who couldn’t even get an academic job, much less a doctorate in his field of expertise.
  • Here are some Einstein-isms that have particular meaning for the technology entrepreneurs of today.
  • Imagination is more important than knowledge. So true, it’s one thing to know the technical aspects of how to do something, but when you work in a creative field, imagination trumps knowledge every single time.
  • Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new. When you’re creating something out of the blue, it’s going to take lots-o-tweaking before you get it just right, and you have to get comfortable with not knowing the end result. Sometimes ideas take off and become extremely profitable. Other times they just flop.
  • Great spirits have often encountered violent opposition from weak minds. I think that when you look at opposition in the right light, it can be a major motivator. You want to show them your vision, show them that you know what you’re doing. The trick is to turn negativity into positive momentum.
  • The only real valuable thing is intuition. You need to develop a “gut feel” that will help you detect if a person, idea or situation is healthy for you. Those who have the best intuition have the greatest success.
  • We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them. Einstein’s creativity was heavily influenced by a thinking technique he called “thought experiments”, which was actually just plain old fashioned daydreaming.. This just goes to show that imagination, play, and a willingness to try new things is the key to being a visionary.