Show of 10-25-2014

Tech Talk

October 25, 2014

Email and Forum Questions
  • Email from Mary: Dr. Shurtz, Here is the speed test for my FiOS Service w/ Verizon.  My speed test showed 10 MB upload and 5 MB download speeds. I only have FiOS internet (no TV and no phone and don’t want TV or phone from them which are the only plans that give a better price plan or so Verizon has told me….) and pay 47.99/mo for this. I’ve called to try & get a better plan, but, in order to improve this he next step up is almost double my current price. Anyway, is this the reason why when I make phone calls via my OOMA service causing the receiver of my call to say that they can’t hear but ever other word? It happens intermittently; not all people say they can’t hear me….Thanks! Mary
  • Tech Talk Response: Your upload and downloads speeds are adequate for VoIP. Is there something on your network that is using bandwidth? You should not have any problems. Check the latency. Use www.broadbandreports.com and go to tools to find the speed tests. There is a discussion thread about a problem with Ooma and Verizon for some customers. Ooma has worked with Verizon to reroute the traffic and this worked for some regions. Ooma support is reading the threaded discussions and responded to voice quality concerns. Just Google “voice quality Ooma Verizon” to get to these threads. Ooma also has live customer service on their website. Try that instead of the support number.
  • Email from LedbyBrain: Dear Dr Shurtz, This is how my main, professional Gmail acct is set.  I have enabled POP, IMAP, and archive deleted emails.  I want to be sure a have a retained copy of all sent mail messages for at least 18 months. Will this ensure that? I am using Apple Mail client to view this account. I found an article on the internet that said that Gmail sent mail is not saved! Thank You!!
  • Tech Talk Responds: You configuration looks good. Gmail never delete mail,  except for the Trash and Spam folders after 30 days. A sent email is put into the inbox when some answers the email. It you delete that message stream, the sent email is also deleted. That is the most common error when losing sent emails. Good luck.
  • Email from Duc: Dear Tech Talk. I coach a local sports team and all the communication with my team is in my Hotmail account. Unfortunately I can’t access my email. How do I get into my Hotmail/Outlook.com account if I no longer have access to the phone number I set up on the account when I created it years ago. Thanks, Duc, an Ohio coach
  • Tech Talk Responds: It appears that when you’re traveling to different countries, Microsoft is now often requiring that even when you know your password you also must be able to provide a code that is sent to your phone or an alternate email address associated with the account. Two factor authentication is the best way to combat account theft.
  • It is critical that you keep your recovery information up to date. Not doing so is the fastest way to lose access to your account forever should something go wrong. It’s also a way to end up unable to access your account until you return home after traveling.
  • Microsoft does have an account recovery process.  It will opt to send you a code to either an email address for a phone. If neither of those channels works, you must provide enough information to prove who you are. You will  be asked for information like: 
    • Your name and birth date.
    • Your location.
    • The answer to your security question(s), if you had one or more set up.
    • Other passwords that you may have used on this account in the past.
    • The subject lines of any emails you may have sent recently.
    • The names of any folders you’ve created in your account.
    • The email addresses of any contacts to which you’ve recently sent email.
    • Billing information, including a credit card, if you have any associated with the account.
  • The goal here is simple: to be able to provide enough information to prove that you are who you say you are: the rightful account holder. Then that information is sent for an internal Microsoft review. No changes will be made to 30 days to prevent unauthorized attempts. They notify the owner via email of such attempted recoveries. If you are successful, you will be sent a reset link for your account. By the way, you can also set up a recovery code. You can save this code and provide this code to recovery your account, if your email or phones are not available. Good luck, Coach.
  • Email from Alex: Dear Doc and Jim. I’d like to get in touch with my old college. Its been over fifteen years and I would like to reconnect. Where do I start? Thanks Alex in Reston
  • Tech Talk Responds: It is difficult to locate an email address, but you can get lucky. Finding someone’s email address is typically very, very hard for several reasons:
  • There’s no central database or “phone book” for the internet. If all you have is a name, that’s not enough. There could be perhaps thousands of people with the same name. Not everyone wants to be found. It’s easy to set up a free email account with information that has nothing to do with who you really are. 
  • I always try Google first. She may have a presence on the web. If you have a town where she might have resided, that could be useful. Check Facebook, Yahoo, and LinkedIn. If you know their employer, check the directory. You might check the online version of the phone. Finally, there are pay services that claim to be able to find out all sorts of information about people. These are mostly culled from public records also accessible elsewhere. I once did a search for an old colleague using a paid search. I knew the middle initial and where they lived at one point. That was enough to locate them.  The service was $29 and worked quite well. The paid service would not provide an email, but would forward an email to the recipient.
  • Email from Tung in Ohio: Dear Tech Talk, I am trying to upgrade my iPhone to iOS8.1 can’t because I don’t have enough memory. I deleted all my pictures after copying them to the website and still don’t have enough memory. What are my options? Thanks Tung in Ohio
  • Tech Talk Responds: You could connect your phone to your laptop and install the new iOS using iTunes. This would still require some memory in your iPhone. If you have to free up memory, not that Photostream is stored on your iPhone, as well as, Deleted pictures. The deleted pictures stay on your phone for 30 days. You could unsync to music temporarily to delete all the songs from your iPhone too. I have had the same problems. My next iPhone is going to have more memory, at least 64GB and maybe 128GB. 16 MB is just not enough.
  • Email from Alice in Washington: Dear Doc and Jim, I use Gmail for all of my business activity and am worried that I have no backup. What is the best way to back up my Gmail account? Thanks, Alice in Washington DC
  • Tech Talk Responds: The easiest way is to use a desktop email program that supports POP3. You could use programs Outlook, Windows Live Mail, Thunderbird, Apple Mail or others and configure them to download your mail. POP3 is the way traditional email programs that run on your PC get your email from your ISP. It’s perhaps the oldest email protocol still used, and is one of the reasons that so many different email programs – even ones decades old – can often be used for our backup purposes. Once you have an email program, Gmail’s online help has instructions for configuring POP3 access in many popular email programs. The important points are:
  • POP3 access must be enabled in your account – it’s a setting you’ll need to confirm in the web interface at gmail.com. Before you download your email, there is one setting that applies only to using your desktop email program to back up Gmail: “leave messages on server.” The reason that this is so important is that without it your email may be moved from Gmail’s server to your PC and disappear from the web interface. Once configured, when you go to download or “check for new mail” using your email program, you’ll back up Gmail by downloading all your email. The first time it could be a lot, depending on how long you’ve been using Gmail and how much email you have. Do that periodically, and the mail that’s stored on your machine is your backup should you ever lose anything from Gmail.
  • One of the nice side-effects of using your PC to back up Gmail like this is that your backup will, itself, be backed up again when you back up your PC.
Profiles in IT: Håkon Wium Lie
  • Håkon Wium Lie is a web pioneer, a standards activist, best known for proposing the concept of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) while working at CERN in 1994.
  • Håkon Wium Lie born 1965 in Halden, Norway
  • Lie attended Østfold University College, West Georgia College.
  • In 1991, he received an MS in Visual Studies at the MIT Media Lab in 1991.
  • While working with Tim Berners-Lee and Robert Cailliau at CERN in 1994, he proposed the concept of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). 
  • As a showcase and test bed, he integrated CSS into the Arena web browser. 
  • CSS is a style sheet language used for describing the look and formatting of a document written in a markup language. CSS is one of the fundamental web standards, with profound impact on typography, aesthetics, and accessibility.
  • While at W3C, he developed CSS into a W3C Recommendation with Bert Bos.
  • Wium Lie has been an activist for standards in general. He proposed the Acid2 test which was later developed and published by the Web Standards Project.
  • Wium Lie has targeted Microsoft’s Internet Explorer due to its poor support for standards and argued against the use of formatting objects on the web.
  • In 2006, Wium Lie started campaigning for browsers to support downloadable web fonts using common font formats. By 2011, all major browser vendors have implemented web fonts this way. 
  • In 2007, Wium Lie started campaigning for web video elements and standards.
  • Wium Lie has also promoted the concept of printing from the web. 
  • His book on CSS, co-authored with Bert Bos, was produced from HTML and CSS files. These files were then converted to PDF by the Prince XML formatter.
  • In 2011 Wium Lie proposed to extend CSS to support pagination on screens.
  • He has worked for, among others, the W3C, INRIA, CERN, MIT Media Lab, and Norwegian telecom research in Televerket.
  • In December 1996, he became known as the CSS1 W3C Recommendation editor.
  • In April 1999, he joined Opera Software. In 2013, he was named CTO. as of 2013, 
  • In 2006, he received his PhD for University of Oslo. His PhD thesis focused on the foundations work that led to his CSS proposal. 
  • He is a politician for The Pirate Party of Norway, focused on full transparency in state management, privacy on the internet.
  • Wium Lie lives in Oslo, Norway. He is currently lobbying against high rises and billboard advertising.
  • In 1999, he was named to the MIT Technology Review TR100 as one of the top 100 innovators in the world under the age of 35.?
David Burd Surprise Visit
  • iPhone 6 Plus Requires a man purse
  • Can Apple pay be trusted?
  • Advantages of Apple SIM
  • Challenges when exchanging iPhone 6 Plus for iPhone 6…beware
  • More tech humor 
iPhone6 Plus Reviews
  • Great battery life and a great screen. Some a getting two days between charges.
  • However, it is big. Try it before you buy it.
  • I may require a man purse for men. Women already have a purse.
  • Many iPhone6 Plus phones are being exchanged for a iPhone6.
  • Be mindful of the time you have to return the phone. For ATT is only 14 days.
Apple SIM: A great advance
  • Apple has built a SIM card that lets you jump between AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile without having to swap it out (or, more annoyingly, track down/purchase a new SIM card when you want to switch carriers). Instead of swapping the card, you just pick a new carrier through the device’s on screen settings. As it should be!
  • Apple calls the new SIM: Apple SIM.”
    • The Apple SIM gives you the flexibility to choose from a variety of short-term plans from select carriers in the U.S. and UK right on your iPad. So whenever you need it, you can choose the plan that works best for you — with no long-term commitments. And when you travel, you may also be able to choose a data plan from a local carrier for the duration of your trip.
  • The Apple SIM doesn’t seem to be something you can buy separately for now, but it comes out of the box in the cell-enabled iPad Air 2.
  • This one SIM is currently compatible with AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile in the U.S., and EE in the UK. That list will presumably expand in time, as carriers realize that not being one of the available options is probably bad for business.
  • AT&T is not supporting this interchangeability and is locking the SIM included with cellular models of the iPad Air 2 and Retina iPad mini 3 after it is used with an AT&T plan. 
  • AT&T appears to be the only participating carrier that is locking the Apple SIM to its network. T-Mobile’s John Legere has indicated that T-Mobile’s process does not lock a customer in to T-Mobile, which appears to be confirmed by Apple’s support document, and Sprint’s process also seems to leave the Apple SIM unlocked and able to be used with other carrier plans. Verizon, the fourth major carrier in the United States, did not opt to allow the Apple SIM to work with its network.
Top Cities for Tech Startups
  • An Associated Press article
  • In the first nine months of the year, venture capitalists poured $24 billion into tech startups around the country. About half of that funding went to San Francisco and Silicon Valley, according to the National Venture Capital Association.
  • Here are the top 20 metropolitan areas receiving such funding through Sept. 30, ranked by funding amount. The figures include tech startups for software, business services, networking and telecom, but exclude some categories such as biotech, energy, medical devices and retail.
1. San Francisco, $9.32 billion, 506 deals
2. San Jose, California (Silicon Valley), $3.78 billion, 237 deals
3. New York, $3.05 billion, 272 deals
4. Boston, $1.05 billion, 158 deals
5. Los Angeles-Long Beach, California (Silicon Beach), $768 million, 105 deals
6. Oakland, California, $510 million, 41 deals
7. Seattle-Bellevue-Everett, Washington, $471 million, 56 deals
8. Provo-Orem, Utah, $462 million, nine deals
9. Washington D.C., $456 million, 77 deals
10. Chicago, $402 million, 57 deals
11. Austin-San Marcos, Texas, $315 million, 58 deals
12. Salt Lake City-Ogden, Utah, $275 million, 16 deals
13. Denver, $240 million, 26 deals
14. Atlanta, $233 million, 32 deals
15. Orange County, California, $212 million, 46 deals
16. San Diego, $140 million, 31 deals
17. Phoenix, $136 million, 12 deals
18. Dallas, $132 million, 21 deals
19. Philadelphia, $125 million, 32 deals
20. Pittsburgh, $124 million, 35 deals