Show of 10-23-2010

  • Email and Forum Questions
    • Email from Lauren: Dear Dr. Richard Shurtz. I have a bunch of email addresses in a Yahoo acct that I’d like to move to my gmail acct. Is there a way to import the email addresses? Most Appreciated Lauren, Dedicated Fan.
    • Tech Talk Responds: Transferring contacts is quite easy. You first export your contacts from Yahoo in to CSV file (Comma Separated Values). The import the CSV file into Gmail.
      • In Yahoo! Mail: Select Options | Mail Options from the Yahoo! Mail menu. Go to the Contact Options category. Select Import/Export under Management. Look for Yahoo! CSV under Export and click Export Now. Click Save when prompted what to do with the file download. Choose the location where you want to save the Yahoo.csv file.
      • In Gmail, click on Contacts. On the bottom of the window, click on More Actions. Select Import. Click Browse to the locate the Yahoo.csv file. When located, click Import.
    • Email from Angelica: Dear Tech Talk. What free phishing program do you recommend? Love the show. Thanks, Angelica.
    • Tech Talk Responds: You must mean an anti-phishing tool, to protect you from phishing scams, just like anti-virus programs to protect you from viruses and anti-spyware tools to protect against spyware.You can set up your browser to avoid known phishing sites. However, most phishing scams come by email and use a variety of sites to steal your data.
    • Your best protection is vigilance.There is no effective software solution. You are the best anti-phishing tool. Phishing attempts are all about fooling you, not the computer.
    • Phishing uses social engineering. Consider the classic case: you have a Yahoo account and you receive an email warning that you will lose your account unless you reply with important information like your social security number, your email address and your password. No software. No viruses or malware. No malicious web sites. Just an email. An email that’s attempting to fool you into doing something that you absolutely should not. That’s phishing.
      • Email that asks for your login ID and password is bogus. Delete it.
      • If it’s too good to be true, it’s not true.
      • Never click that emailed link. Go to the website yourself.
    • Of course, keep your anti-virus, anti-spyware up to date.
  • Profiles in IT: Peter Norton
    • Peter Norton is a programmer best known for Norton Utilities and computer books.
    • Peter Norton was born November 14, 1943 in Aberdeen, WA and raised in Seattle.
    • He attended Reed College in Portland, Oregon, graduating in 1965.
    • Before discovering microcomputers, he spent a twelve years working on mainframes and minicomputers for companies including Boeing and Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
    • His earliest low level system utilities were designed to allow mainframe programmers access to some RAM that IBM normally reserved for diagnostics.
    • When the IBM PC was released 1981, Norton was among the first to buy one.
    • After he was laid off during an aerospace industry cutback, he took up microcomputer programming to make ends meet.
    • One day he accidentally erased a file. Rather than re-enter the data, as most would have, he decided to write a program to recover the information from the disk.
    • His friends were delighted with the program and he developed a group of utility programs that he sold—one at a time—to user groups.
    • In 1982, he founded Peter Norton Computing with $30,000 and an IBM computer.
    • Its 1982 introduction of the Norton Utilities included Norton’s popular UNERASE tool to retrieve erased data from DOS disks.
    • Norton marketed the program by distributing pamphlets with technical notes to users group meetings and computer stores.
    • The publisher called him and asked him if he wanted to write a book. Norton’s first computer book, Inside the IBM PC: Access to Advanced Features & Programming (Techniques) was published in 1983.
    • He began writing monthly columns in 1982 for PC Magazine and later PC Week magazine as well, which he wrote until 1987.
    • In 1984, Norton Computing reached $1 million in revenue with three employees when he released Norton Utilities 3.0
    • He hired his fourth employee and first programmer, Brad Kingsbury, in July 1985.
    • Kingsbury was the sole designer and programmer of subsequent Norton Utilities.
    • In 1983, Norton started on The Peter Norton Programmer’s Guide to the IBM PC.
    • The 1985 edition was nicknamed "the pink shirt book", after the pink shirt that Norton wore for the cover photo.
    • Norton Computing reached $5M in 1986, $11M in 1987, and $15M in 1988.
    • Norton himself was named Entrepreneur of the Year by Arthur Young in the 1988 High Technology Award Winner Greater Los Angeles Region.
    • In August 1990, Norton (now at $25 million in sales) to Symantec for $70M in stock.
    • It became a division of Symantec and renamed Peter Norton Computing Group.
    • Quote hw would like to forget on computer viruses: We’re dealing with an urban myth. It’s like the story of alligators in the sewers of New York. Everyone knows about them, but no one’s ever seen them.
    • At 46, he became a full-time art collector and philanthropist for the next twelve years.
    • In 2002, he invested Acorn Technologies and now serves as Chairman of the Board.
    • Norton is also chairman of eChinaCash, a company he founded in 2003.
  • Website of the Week: inumbr.com
    • Web address: http://www.inumbr.com
    • If you ever need to hand out your phone number in a public forum or, say, give your number to a stranger on Craigslist, you rarely want to give away your real number.
    • Free service inumbr generates free, auto-expiring phone numbers.
    • Just go to the site, pick your city, set your expiration time (one hour, one day, one week), then tell it where to forward your calls.
    • A simple throw away number is nice to have under the right circumstances.
    • They warn that is does not work for the Craigslist phone verification because their VoIP numbers are not in the approved database of numbers.
  • Sex.com Sells for $13M
    • Clover Holdings has bid $13M for sex.com.
    • Escom, the current holder, put Sex.com up for sale after declaring bankruptcy earlier this year.
    • Clover can’t officially claim ownership until the sale is approved by the bankruptcy court overseeing Escom.
    • BBC News describes Clover Holding as an obscure company registered on the Caribbean island of St. Vincent.
    • Escom bought the Sex.com domain name in 2006 for an estimated $14 million.
    • The domain name has a checkered history.
      • The site was first registered in 1994 by its original owner, Gary Kremen, the founder of Match.com.
      • Kremen lost the domain the following year after Stephen Cohen wrote a letter to Network Solutions requesting them to transfer the name to him.
      • Without checking the legitimacy of the letter, Network Solutions transferred Sex.com to Cohen, who apparently collected around $40 million from the site.
      • Kremen did finally won a $65 million judgment against Cohen, but Cohen moved his money overseas before hightailing it out of the country.
      • In 2003, an appeals court ruled that Kremen had the right to the domain name.
      • The court also found Network Solutions, now owned by VeriSign, liable.
      • Settled in 2004, the suit established a precedent requiring that domain name registrars be held accountable for the domains they manage.
      • Kremen eventually Sex.com to Escom for $14M in 2006.
    • Highest priced domain names.
      • Sex.com – $13 million (2010)
      • Porn.com – $9.5 million (2007)
      • Diamond.com – $7.5 million (2006)
      • Slots.com – $5.5 million (2010)
      • Toys.com – $5.1 million (2009)
      • Clothes.com – $4.9 million (2009)
      • Vodka.com – $3 million (2006)
      • Candy.com – $3 million (2008)
      • Shopping.de – $2.8 million (2008)
      • Creditcards.com – $2.7 million (2004)
  • Online Application of the Week: Pixlr.com
    • Web address: http://www.pixlr.com 
    • Pixlr supports two online cloud-based image tools: Pixlr Editor and Pixlr Express.
    • They are built in Flash.
    • They allow you to edit images online. You can save them to an online directory if you create a free accound.
    • Since the editors are Flash-based, how they run depends on what kind of computer you have.
    • You need to close any other web pages using flash or any applications that may be using CPU time, if you want the fastest response.
    • Site includes 32 tutorials about using this sophisticated tool.
    • Photoshop-like…only free and available everywhere.
    • This is a great tool to tweak your images.
  • iPhone secondary market spurs upgrades
    • This is trick used by many of the Stratford students.
    • Used iPhone can be sold on eBay for $300.
    • You can bay a new iPhone with a one-year contract from AT&T for $200.
    • Without a contract, AT&T charges $500.
    • Many upgrade their iPhone each year for $200 (selling their old iPhone for $300).
    • The old iPhones can be unlocked and used with any GSM carrier.
  • Wikileaks Releases Iraqi War Documents
    • At 5pm EST Friday 22nd October 2010 WikiLeaks released the largest classified military leak in history.
    • The 391,832 reports (‘The Iraq War Logs’), document the war in Iraq, from 1st January 2004 to 31st December 2009 (except for the months of May 2004 and March 2009) as told by soldiers in the United States Army.
    • Each is a ‘SIGACT’ or Significant Action in the war.
    • Pentagon spokesman warned U.S. troops not to read the leaked documents. The information remains classified even if it is released publicly.
    • Web site’s alleged source for the files is Bradley Manning, the Army intelligence specialist who is facing charges
    • The problem with censoring Wikileaks is the difficulty of convincing an Internet service provider in Sweden, or Swedish government, that material that publishing the material is illegal under Swedish law.
    • Even if Wikileaks.org is taken offline, the group has long planned mirror sites in other nations.
    • Update of Wikileaks founder
      • Sweden’s immigration authority denied WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange’s application for a residence permit this week.
      • The Australian has sought to establish a base for WikiLeaks in Sweden to take advantage of its laws protecting whistle-blowers.
      • He applied for a residence and work permit on Aug. 18.
  • Three major networks block Google TV
    • ABC, CBS and NBC confirmed that this week they began blocking Google TV from accessing full-length episodes of prime-time shows.
    • Google TV seeks to marry the Internet with television by allowing viewers to search the Web for shows and then watch them on their TV sets.
    • The technology is designed to make it easier for people to watch TV shows when they want, rather than be at the mercy of network schedules or sift through the Web to find shows on the networks’ own websites.
    • The networks fear, among other things, that Google TV could disrupt advertising and encourage people to discontinue their cable TV service.
    • Cable providers pay billions in fees to carry the programming of the networks’ co-owned cable channels.
    • Others have cited fears that Google TV would fuel piracy by letting viewers access bootleg streams of TV shows on the Internet.
    • Some content providers have sought to work with Google. Time Warner Inc. plans to offer HBO Go — which allows people who already pay for HBO on cable or satellite to watch shows online — through Google TV.

  • Water on the Moon
    • A spent rocket stage that NASA sent hurtling into the moon last year in hopes of kicking up water from a polar crater delivered on that mission, revealing that at least a moderate portion of its target was indeed made of ice.
    • But the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) revealed much more than that—hinting at a rich mixture of chemicals in the crater, including carbon monoxide, mercury and possibly silver.
    • LCROSS involved two complementary pieces of hardware—a spent Centaur rocket as an impactor that produced a towering debris plume, and a sophisticated shepherding spacecraft that trailed it to sniff out water in the plume before crashing into the moon as well four minutes later.
    • Data collected by the sensor-laden spacecraft, as well as measurements from a lunar orbiter passing overhead, are the basis for a suite of research papers about the mission appearing in the October 22 issue of Science.
    • The researchers estimate that the second spacecraft saw as much as 155 kilograms of water in its field of view.
    • The measurements imply concentrations of 5.6 percent water in the lunar soil.
    • Among the chemical species detected in the plume by the trailing spacecraft are carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide as well as sodium and silver, although not all detections were conclusive.
    • Good news for those who want to create a settlement on the moon.