Show of 1-30-2010

  • Email and Forum Questions
    • Email from Lauren: Dear Dr. Shurtz, I use this software for security protection: ESET Smart Security 4. It has a folder, ESET Antispam that redirects emails I send to myself into the SPAM folder. I don’t want this to occur. Once I find them in this ESET Antispam folder I can’t even move them into the folder I want to move them into. I use Outlook express. Can you please advise how I can fix this? Thanks, Lauren
    • Tech Talk Answers: As you may know, ESET developed NOD32. NOD32 is an excellent anti-virus software program. This is included in their Smart Security package.
    • ESET has many ways to configure the AntiSpam module. It has a whitelist (allowed email sources) and a blacklist (banned email sources). You can add your own address to the whitelist. Go to File/ESET Security/Add to whitelist (or blacklist). All of your contacts were automatically added to the whitelist. If an email is classified as spam incorrectly, you must reclassify it as not spam, and ESET will move it to the correct folder for you. By the way, ESET Antispam has gotten good reviews.
    • Email from Arnie: Dear Dr. Shurtz, You asked for more questions via emails on your show this morning, so here goes. My son, who lives in Kodiak, Alaska, received an upgraded iPhone for Christmas which as video capability. He sent us two videos with a ".MOV" suffix or trailer, which I can’t open. I really enjoy your program and thanks for any assist you can give me and others to solve this problem. Arnie McKechnie, Davidsonville, MD
    • Tech Talk Answers: Arnie, you easiest solution is to install Apple QuickTime which includes the MOV, AVI, MPEG codecs. If you don’t want to install QuickTime, you can add the MOV codec to Media Player with a free download. Finally you can download a file free file converter and convert the file from MOV to AVI or MPEG. . This is the most time consuming option. Go to CNET Download and select a converter. Pazera Free MOV to AVI is rated with four stars. It converts QuickTime videos (MOV, QT) into AVI, or MPG (MPEG-1, MPEG-2). CNet downloads are scanned for spyware.
    • Email from Al: Dear Dr. Shurtz, I think the show was a rerun, so you might know this already. 
    • Question was is TWAIN an acronym for?
      • TWAIN is an image capture API for Microsoft Windows and Apple
      • Macintosh operating systems that was first released in 1992.
      • TWAIN is typically used as an interface between image processing software and a scanner or digital camera.
      • The word TWAIN is from Kipling’s "The Ballad of East and West: " – and never the twain shall meet…", reflecting the difficulty, at the time,
      • of connecting scanners and personal computers.
      • It was up-cased to TWAIN to make it more distinctive. This led people to believe it was an acronym. The name, Technology without an Interesting Name, continues to haunt the standard. "
    • Really enjoy the show as I met several of the people you profile and knew of most of the others. Al Miller, Rockville
    • Tech Talk Responds: Thanks for the correction.
  • Profiles in IT: Nicholas K. Sheridan
    • Creator of the first e-paper while working at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center
    • Nick Sheridan has BS and MS in Physics, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI.
    • He worked at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center from Aug 1979 to Jan 2001.
      • For the first nine years he was a Research Fellow. He was promoted to Senior Research Follow in May 1988.
      • According to his resume, he was the highest ranked non-management scientist at PARC, although I did manage research groups ranging in size from 2 to 10 people.
    • In 1974, Nick invented what would become a precursor to e-paper. He was working on a display for the Alto personal computer.
      • A Gyricon display consists of a highly transparent silicone rubber sheet in which a high density of 100 micron balls has been dispersed.
      • Each ball is black on one hemisphere and white on the other, and the two hemispheres have different, permanent electrical charges.
      • Each ball sits in an oil-filled cavity about 20 % larger than the ball, allowing the ball to rotate in response to an applied voltage.
      • Beneath the sheet, a circuit board applied an electrical current that rotated the balls, generating simple black-and-white patterns on the display.”
      • The balls stick to the cavity walls after they have rotated, providing long term (months, years) image storage without the continued application of voltage.
      • This new display technology was that it was thinner and lighter than a transitional display and required very little power. Power was only consumed when the balls were rotated.
      • He called the invention Gyricon. Gyricon is a Greek term for rotating image.
      • His patents are the earliest in the field of electronic paper.
      • The project was dropped because Xerox was not in the display business. They were in the copier business.
    • He went on work on many other projects at PARC including the first multi-function office machine (copier, scanner, fax, and printer).
    • He was one of the most prolific researchers at PARC and holds 93 U.S.  Patents.
    • This technology was not pursued by Xerox and remained dormant until the mid-90s.
      • Joseph Jacobson, a research scientist at the MIT Media lab started working on a slightly different approach to electronic paper.
      • Jacobson and his graduate assistants developed microcapsules that were transparent and filled with blue dye and white titanium dioxide chips.
      • The then went to a mixture of black and white particles in a clear liquid.
      • Jacobson started the company e-ink to develop this technology.
    • Nick co-founded Gyricon in January 2001 as a PARC spin-off company.
      • He served as Director of Research from its inception to January 2006 when Xerox pulled the plug on it.
      • Gyricon focused on making displays for stores rather than e-paper technology.
      • The successful e-paper companies, such as E Ink, set out to be display media companies that let the customers invent the applications.
    • Nick is now consults and works on the next ideal e-paper technology in his lab at home.
  • Apple iPad Reviewed
    • The iPad is a tablet, positioned between the iPod and a NetBook.
      • The tablet’s multi-touch screen measures in at 9.7 inches.
      • Screen resolution is 1024 x 768.
      • It is smaller than the smallest MacBook, but a larger than the iPhone.
      • It’s 0.5 inches thick and measures 9.56 x 7.47 inches.
      • It weighs 1.5 pounds without 3G, and 1.6 with.
      • 1GHz Apple ARM A4 chip
      • Keyboard is large enough to type normally with all fingers.
      • Operating system is based on iPhone OS.
    • Other features
      • 16GB, 32GB or 64GB of flash storage.
      • 802.11n Wi-Fi
      • Bluetooth 2.1 + EDR (Enhanced Data Rate)
      • 3G GSM with unlocked with micro-SIM card
      • 30-pin iPod connector, a speaker
      • Microphone, an accelerometer and a compass.
      • There is no camera.
      • Apple claims a 10-hour battery life.
    • Applications
      • Browser is an upgraded version of Safari Mobile.
      • No Flash support.
      • Email, Maps, Photos, and Music like iPhone/iPod.
      • Run iPhone apps, but they only fill part of the screen.
      • Apple’s opened an ebook store to accompany the iPad (called iBook).
      • Apple designed a new iWork suite just for the tablet.
    • 3G is available without contract from AT&T
      • $15/m for 250 MB data
      • $30/m unlimited data
    • Pricing without 3G:
      • $499: 16GB
      • $599: 32GB
      • $699: 64GB
    • Pricing With 3G:
      • $629: 16GB
      • $729: 32GB
      • $829: 64GB
  • Windows 7 Launch Creates Profit Surge
    • The release of Windows 7 increased MS net income.
    • Revenues from Windows are up 70%. Other divisions remained flat.
    • PC users purchased record numbers of Win licenses in the last 3 months of 2009.
    • Microsoft’s non-Windows divisions reported stagnant or otherwise disappointing performance:
    • Sales of Office were flat and revenue for online services declined 5 percent.
    • It looks like Vista was just a bad dream for MS.
  • Asia Challenges U.S. Innovation Leadership
    • A report released last week by the National Science Board concludes that U.S. global leadership in science and technology is declining as foreign nations – especially China and other Asian countries – rapidly develop their national innovation systems.
    • China is achieving a dramatic amount of synergy by increasing its investment in science and engineering education, in research, and in infrastructure.
    • The report, Science and Engineering Indicators 2010, is published every two years by the National Science Board, a 25-member expert council that advises the National Science Foundation, President, and Congress on science and technology policy.
    • Asia’s rapid ascent as a major world science and technology (S&T) center—beyond Japan—is driven by developments in China and several other Asian economies.
    • Governments [in Asia] have implemented a host of policies to boost S&T capabilities as a means to ensuring their economies’ competitive edge.
    • The United States continues to maintain a position of leadership but has experienced a gradual erosion of its position in many specific areas.
      • Asia has narrowed the gap due to the sustained annual increases by China.
      • U.S. investment in R&D as a ratio of total GDP has remained relatively constant since the mid-1980s, at around 2.7%,
      • The federal share of total R&D in US has been consistently declining. In contrast, Asian nations have rapidly expanded their R&D to GDP ratio.
    • Increasingly, governments around the world have come to regard movement toward a knowledge-based economy as key to economic progress.
      • Realizing that this requires a well-trained workforce, they have invested in upgrading and expanding their higher education systems and broadening participation.
      • The U.S. higher education system maintains critical strengths – especially U.S. research universities, which perform 56% of U.S. basic research and educate the majority of future scientists and engineers – but its position continues to decline in terms of S&E graduates.
    • US students earned only 11% of the world’s 4 million S&E first university degrees (equivalent to an undergraduate degree) awarded in 2006, compared to 21% in China and 19% in the European Union. 
      • A large portion of these degrees in the United States are awarded to foreign students.
      • International students received 24% of U.S. S&E master’s degrees, 33% of S&E doctoral degrees, and 4% of S&E bachelor’s degrees in 2007.
      • Twenty-five percent of all college-educated U.S. workers in S&E occupations in 2003 were foreign born.
      • About half of all foreign-born scientists and engineers are from Asia, and more than a third of U.S.-resident doctorate holders come from China (22%) and India (14%).
  • Global Demographic Trends
    • Demographic Bonus in India and China
    • Shortage of Workers in the US over the next 20 years
    • Tightened immigration policy is making US less inviting.
    • Innovators are going back home to start their companies there.
    • US Education is respected worldwide, but is becoming less accessible to the international community.
    • US government taxation and spending policy is not focused on increasing our innovation advantage.
    • Our Innovation EcoSystem may be damaged in the long term.
    • Is the US passing the leadership baton to India and China?
  • Website of the Week: Foodista
    • Foodista: The Cooking Encyclopedia Everyone Can Edit
    • Web Address: http://www.foodista.com
    • Foodista is a collaborative project to build the world’s largest, highest quality cooking encyclopedia.
    • Foodista organizes cooking information into four linked categories:
      • Recipes: Combinations of ingredients.
      • Foods: The most basic of ingredients. Either as they are produced naturally, such as apples and eggs, or with minimal processing, such as salt or flour.
      • Cooking Techniques: Methods of preparing foods, such as baking, boiling, slicing, and braising.
      • Kitchen Tools: All the gadgets, appliances, and equipment you use to make meals, including saucepan, chef’s knife, blender, and cutting board.
    • The site uses pictures of food from Flickr Creative Commons and encourages uploading of photos from directly to the site.
    • Tools For Food Bloggers – The site has embeddable widgets that create automated links from Foodista to your food blog. These links will help you build traffic to your blog and improve search engine rankings.
    • Foodista, Inc. was founded in February of 2008 and launched on December 17, 2008.
    • For instance: 684 fudge recipes, 961 pizza recipes, 828 chocolate chip cookie recipes.