Show of 12-19-2009

  • Email and Forum Questions
    • Letter from Annie Hsu: Hello. I have listen to your programs in OH! ZONE. I like the programs very much! Thank you for providing the best programs for everyone. Annie
    • Letter from Clarence Wang: Hello DJ, I very interest about you program "Tech Talk Radio Show." It can promote me to learn English better! And to practice my English listening. I am thank you to make the program and hope it can be much in Oh! Zone website! Clarence
    • Tech Talk Answers: We love our Oh! Zone listeners.
    • Email from Ken: Hi. A minor point: I don’t know who does the "Profiles in IT" announcement, but the voice for "There’s a letter in your mailbox" is George Carlin. Ken in Gaithersburg .
    • Tech Talk Answers: Thanks Ken. We’ll check on the Profiles in IT.
    • Email from Arnie: Hi Dr. Shurtz, Have you ever heard of "flogging" with respect to the internet? It appears that companies will do most anything to prevent any kind of criticism of their product, as in this case the V-22 tiltrotor aircraft. I was wondering if you had heard of "flogging." Arnie McKechnie Davidsonville
    • Tech Talk Answers: Bloggers who are paid to push a particular point of view by a company are called Fake Bloggers. This has been contracted to floggers. Real blogger have a strong dislike for them and try to root them out.
    • Email from Ann: Dear Tech Talk, I am being locked out of my hotmail account and have to reset the password frequently. What is the problem? I am using a strong password so I don’t think I am being hacked. Love the show. Ann
    • Tech Talk Answers: Someone may be trying to log onto your account and locking it. More than likely, it is a spammer trying to penetrate your account. Or it could be a Trojan on your computer sending spam without your knowing. Spam will cause hotmail to shut down your account.
  • Profiles in IT: Donald D. Chamberlin and Raymond F. Boyce
    • Principal designers of the original Structured Query Language (SQL) language specification. SQL is the world’s most widely-used database language.
    • Donald D. Chamberlin was born in San Jose , CA , in 1944.
      • Chamberlin earned his BS in engineering in 1966 from Harvey Mudd College .
      • He earned his MS and PhD in EE in 1967 and 1971 from Stanford University .
      • He joined IBM Research in Yorktown Heights , New York , in 1971.
    • Raymond F. Boyce grew up in New York and went to college in Providence , RI .
      • He received his PhD from Purdue in 1971.
      • After graduation he was hired by IBM Research in Yorktown Heights , NY .
    • Background conditions leading to SQL
      • The IBM RAMAC disk drive was released in 1957. It stored five megabytes of data and cost $50,000 dollars. Businesses realized that data had value.
      • In 1970, Dr. E.F. Codd introduced a basis for a relational database system in an essay called "A Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks."
      • The key concept is that data sits in tables, and that data elements within different tables can be related in some way to provide meaningful information.
      • Codd introduced database normalization. He said "if Nixon could normalize relations with China , he could normalize a database."
      • Codd felt you should tell the computer what you wanted it to do and let it figure out the best method, rather than directly manipulate the data.
      • The same battle was fought by the creator of FORTRAN who put many assembly language programmers out of a job.
    • The need for a simplified language
      • In the early 70s, Chamberlin and Boyce developed a query language called SQUARE, which stood for Specifying Queries As Relational Expressions.
      • In 1973, when IBM consolidated its database research, Chamberlin and Boyce were transferred to San Jose to work with Dr. E. F. Codd.
      • Codd’s notation was very mathematical and not user friendly.
      • Chamberlin and Boyce sought to capture the essence of Codd’s ideas in a simple language.
      • In 1974, Chamberlin and Boyce introduced a new language with data retrieval capabilities called SEQUEL, which stood for Structured English Query Language – later SQL to avoid trademark issues with an aircraft company.
      • The first commercial relational database entered the market in 1979. The product was called Oracle V2 made by Relational Software.
      • Shortly after its debut, IBM released rival System R. Finally the pressure from a competitor forced IBM to actually release this product.
    • The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) made SQL the standard language for relational databases in 1986.
    • Raymond Boyce died in 1974 as a result of an aneurysm of the brain.
    • After his database research, Chamberlin worked on structured document generation.
    • In 2000, Chamberlin drafted a proposal for an XML query language called Quilt, in conjunction with Jonathan Robie and Daniela Florescu.
    • Many of his ideas found their way into the XQuery language specification, which was developed by W3C with Chamberlin as principal editor.
    • Chamberlin has authored two books and more than 50 technical papers.
  • Driving on Slippery Roads
    • Speed — Speed is your enemy on slippery roads. Kinetic energy is increases as velocity squared. Doubling the speed increases kinetic energy by four. This makes stopping distance four times longer.
    • Stopping Distance – In slippery conditions, the coefficient of friction is as much as eight times lower than it is for dry conditions. This means that stopping distance, compared to dry conditions, is eight times longer.
    • Recovering from Skidding – If the care skids to the one side, steer the car in that direction until you get some traction. Then gradually steer the car back on track.
    • ABS — Maximum traction between the road and the tire is the point just before the tire begins to slip. The Anti-lock Braking System (ABS) keeps near that point by releasing the brake as soon as the wheel locks and then immediately reapplies it. It is the electronic equivalent of "pumping" the brakes. If you have ABS brakes, apply constant pressure. You will feel vibration when they are active.
    • Positraction Differential – The differential divides the power between the left and right wheels. If one wheel begins to slip, the positraction differential immediately transfers all power to the other wheel. If the positraction light comes one, slightly ease off on the gas petal to maintain traction with both wheels.
  • How to Tell Is Someone Is On Your Wireless Network
    • Anyone using your wireless network will leave tracks.
    • Firewall logs are a good place to start.
      • If you have a Firewall running on your Computer or on your router, look for suspicious activity by scanning the logs for anything out of the ordinary with inbound and outbound traffic.
      • One method you can use is to look for patterns. For example, if someone was scanning your computer to see what ports are open, the logs will show continuous activity from the same IP Address (an intruder’s computer) sending a stream of data to many different ports to a single IP Address or range of IP Addresses.
    • DHCP Logs are the second place to look
      • If the unwanted guest is not Network savvy, or security on your router is not up to snuff, they may be able to drop in unannounced, by receiving an IP Address from your wireless DHCP server.
      • You can easily view a list of active addresses by checking the DHCP log.
      • You can see and identify all the computers who have received IP addresses.
      • Unfortunately, a more sophisticated hacker can get around the need to rely on DHCP. If they did their homework (you can be sure of that), they probably figured out the range of IP Addresses in use on your Network, found an unused address in that range and configure their PC with the static address.
    • Check Your Computer for any unusual activity.
      • Now that you identified the trusted computers are on your network (from the DHCP logs), you can check who is connected to your computer.
      • To do this, open a command prompt and enter the following command:
      • netstat -an
      • a = Displays all connections and listening ports
        n = Displays addresses and port numbers in numerical form
  • Tech Gifts
    • e-Reader (Amazon’s Kindle or Barnes and Noble’s Nook)
    • Digital Video Camcorders (HD, Flash Memory, DVD)
    • Laptop or Netbook with Windows 7
    • External hard drive for data backup.
    • Smartphone: Motorola Droid or iPhone
    • DNA Artwork ( www.dna11.com ) $199 to $1,200. Also Kiss Portraits
    • Slingbox Pro HD ($270). Get your content anywhere in the world with just an Internet connection.
    • Logitech Harmony Universal Remote. Program online. ($149)
    • WowWee Rovia ($230, www.wowwee.com )
    • Make your own DNA Ink (ScienceWiz 123 DNA Extraction, $15, www.sciencewiz.com )
    • Genographic Project Test ($100, trace to roots back to Adam and Eve, genographic.nationalgeographic.com/ )
    • OOMA Telo for VoIP ($259)
  • The Logic of the Classroom
    • Logic of the Students Mind
      • Must be the framework upon which the instructor builds the concepts
    • Logic of the Content
      • Logic of terminology
      • Logical Relationships
    • Logic of Reasoning
      • Elements of Critical Thinking
      • Standards of Critical Thinking