Show of 10-20-2007

  • DECT 6.0 Phone System
    • DECT 6.0 operates at 1.9 GHz and does not interfere with 802.11 Wi-Fi Networks (2.4 and 5.4 GHz bands)
    • DECT stands for Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications.
    • Communication up to 50 meters indoors and 300 meters outdoors over up to 7 channels.
    • Secure voice transmission through socket layers.
    • Clear reception and a minimum of line noise and loudness.
    • One way paging from base to handset, Caller ID, and Intercom
    • I got the Uniden phone package for only $120. Only one phone line needed.
    • Transfer contact list between phones, but had to enter all contacts manually into one phone.
  • Profiles in IT: Dr. Martin Cooper
    • Martin Cooper was born December 26, 1926 in Chicago.
    • He is considered the father of the cell phone.
    • He received his degree in electrical engineering from the Illinois Institute of Technology in 1950 and received his master’s degree from the same institution in 1957.
    • After four years in the navy serving on destroyers and a submarine, he worked for a year at a telecommunications company.
    • Hired by Motorola in 1954, he worked on developing portable products, including the first portable handheld police radios, made for the Chicago police department in 1967.
    • He then led Motorola’s cellular research. He was eventually promoted to Corporate Director of Research and Development for Motorola.
    • Cooper is the inventor named on US patent 3,906,166, Radio telephone system.
    • Cooper is considered the inventor of the first portable handset and the first person to make a call on a portable cell phone on April 3, 1973 in New York. That first call, placed to his rival Joel Engel, Bell Labs’ head of research.
    • The brick-like phone weighed 30 ounces (1.87 pounds). The phone was 10 inches high, 3 inches deep and an inch-and-a-half wide. The commercially available model was 2.5 pounds, 10 inches x 5inches x 1.75 inches, 35 minute talk time, and 10 hour charge time.
    • Cooper later revealed that watching Captain Kirk talking in his communicator on the TV-show Star Trek inspired him to research the mobile phone.
    • Cooper’s Law is the semantically incorrect name used for his observation that the number of radio frequency conversations which can be concurrently conducted in a given area has doubled every 30 months since Marconi’s spark gap transmitter, over 100 years ago.
    • Cooper believes the next big advancement in the wireless industry will be ubiquitous, wide-area, high-speed access to the Internet.
    • To that end, he is currently serving as chairman and chief executive of privately held San Jose, California-based ArrayComm, which developed a technology which uses smart antennas to increase spectral efficiency and network throughput.
    • Quote from Martin Cooper: ?I’m rich beyond all imagination in satisfaction and in happiness and in self-fulfillment. But not necessarily in dollars and cents.?
  • Mobile Phones on Planes in Europe Likely
    • The likelihood of mobile-phone usage being allowed on flights within Europe increased on Thursday after Ofcom issued a report on the matter.
    • The new proposals are the result of negotiations within the European Union, and will therefore cover all European airspace–although what will happen with flights leaving that airspace remains to be seen.
      • Ofcom is proposing a mobile base station on each plane.
      • Calls would be routed by satellite and treated as if the user were roaming.
      • Revenue would come from a deal between airline and onboard operator.
      • Two operators are to offer such a service: OnAir and Aeromobile.
    • All mobile telephony equipment would need to be switched off during landing and takeoff.
    • It would then be allowed to be on at a minimum height of 9,842 feet (3,000 meters).
    • The first phase of the service’s introduction would enable GSM voice and GPRS data, but it may extend to 3G and beyond in the future.
    • The U.S. Federal Aviation Authority ruled earlier this month that it would not allow mobile calls on planes for the foreseeable future.
  • Sale of Spectrum for Cell Phone Usage
    • The spectrum allocated to analog TV will auctioned off by the FCC in January after the mandated switch to digital TV is complete.
    • The commission further mandated in July that those winners must allow open access.
      • Allow consumers to connect any legal devices
      • Allow consumers to run any legal application on the network.
      • License the spectrum for wholesale access.
      • Allow third parties such as ISPs to interconnect via the network.
    • Open access was required to to encourage non-traditional companies, such as Google and other Internet firms, to participate in the 700MHz auction.
    • Despite pressure from mobile carrier Verizon Wireless, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will not change its rules for the auction.
    • Google accused Verizon of playing dirty in its attempt to undermine the rules on open access.
    • A spokesperson for Google said the open-access rules must be in place before it commits to bidding.
  • The Ten Commandments of cell phone etiquette
    • Thou shalt not subject defenseless others to cell phone conversations.
    • Thou shalt not set thy ringer to play La Cucaracha every time thy phone rings.
    • Thou shalt turn thy cell phone off during public performances.
    • Thou shalt not wear more than two wireless devices on thy belt.
    • Thou shalt not dial while driving.
    • Thou shalt not wear thy earpiece when thou art not on thy phone.
    • Thou shalt not speak louder on thy cell phone than thou would on any other phone.
    • Thou shalt not grow too attached to thy cell phone. For obvious reasons, a dependency on constant communication is not healthy. At work, go nuts. At home, give it a rest.
    • Thou shalt not attempt to impress with thy cell phone.
    • Thou shalt not slam thy cell phone down on a restaurant table just in case it rings.
  • Ubuntu’s New ‘Gutsy Gibbon’ Easy to Install
    • The Canonical-backed Ubuntu open-source community released of version 7.10 of its Linux operating system.
    • This latest release, dubbed "Gutsy Gibbon," is proving that Ubuntu Linux can compete with Windows as an everyday desktop system when it comes to usability.
    • Gamers and hardcore media hounds may still feel left out — the system lacks support for popular games.
    • Playing music and watching movies in the new Ubuntu to be every bit as pleasant as it is under OS X or Windows.
    • Gutsy Gibbon is certainly easier to install and set up than Windows Vista, and it’s very close to matching Mac OS X when it comes to making things "just work" out of the box.
    • Wi-Fi, printing, digital cameras and even iPods connections all worked immediately after installation — no drivers or other software required.
    • Gutsy Gibbon ships as a "live CD," which means you can boot from your DVD drive and test Ubuntu without touching your existing system. If you like what you see, committing to Ubuntu is just a matter of clicking "Install."
    • If you choose to dual boot with Windows, you can tell Ubuntu to import all your settings and files. This is what most new Ubuntu users will be doing. It takes about 20 minutes.
    • Once Ubuntu was installed, it rebooted, immediately recognizes Wi-Fi devices and automatically joins my local network using imported settings. It even defaults to Wi-Fi Protected Access encryption, something that required additional configuration in previous versions.
    • Music management is good with the built-in Rhythmbox player. You have to install additional codecs to get MP3 and Windows Media Audio support.
    • DVD playback was a slightly different story. Some problems here with the initial release when playing movies. However, downloading and installing the more robust MPlayer DVD player through the Add/Remove programs panel is easy, and DVD playback in MPlayer worked without a hitch.
    • When it comes to finding and installing applications, the Add/Remove Programs feature in Ubuntu surpasses both Windows and Mac OS X.
    • Whereas Windows and Mac users usually need to comb the web for popular applications for their newly installed systems, Linux users simply turn to the package management program, which makes it easy to browse and install software without scouring Google.
    • Other notable changes in Ubuntu 7.10 are the latest GNOME Desktop, which provides much improved drag-and-drop support to the user interface, and Compiz, the whiz-bang 3-D desktop effects package, which is enabled by default.
    • The AppArmor security framework will also be included.
    • Ubuntu 7.10 will be released as a desktop and server edition, which has new preconfigured installation options for a mail server, file server, print server, and database server, in addition to the existing LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) and DNS options.
    • Thin client support has also been improved for Gutsy.
    • The Ubuntu Linux distribution is online at www.ubuntu.com
  • SETI@Home Has New Set of Eyes
    • SETI@home is a scientific experiment that uses Internet-connected computers in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI). You can participate by running a free program that downloads and analyzes radio telescope data.
    • Website: http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/
    • A new telescope has be built to provide high resolution raw data for SETI@home as it seeks out alien life.
    • The new telescope was funded by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen, the finished array will have 350 six-metre antennas and will be one of the world’s largest. The initial array, which started operation on October 11th, has 43 antennas.
    • The Allen Telescope Array (ATA) will be able to sweep more than one million star systems for radio signals generated by intelligent beings.
    • Its creators hope it will help spot definite signs of alien life by 2025.
    • The ATA is being run by the Seti Institute and the Radio Astronomy Laboratory from the University of California, Berkeley, US
    • When all 350 dishes are gathering data, the ATA’s creators say it will allow the gathering of data on an "unprecedented" scale.
    • The array is situated in Hat Creek, California, and lies about 290 miles (470 km) north of San Francisco.
  • ARP Attack Targets Chinese Internet Security Response Team
    • ARP (Address Resolution Protocol) is used to connect IP address with actual computer physical address on a network.
    • ARP attacks poison the lookup table and send visitors to a different computer which inserted a redirect frame into the web response.
    • This was posted on the CISRT website
      • ARP attack to CISRT.org
      • We are very sorry that when sometimes visiting our some pages, malicious codes are inserted. We think it doesn’t mean that our website has been compromised.
      • It’s maybe due to ARP attack. We have informed our webserver provider to help us check whether it’s due to ARP attack or not.
      • The malicious code is inserted into the top of some pages with links to particular websites.
      • This link is taken the use of the vulnerability of BaoFeng Storm MPS ActiveX. A file "sms.exe" will be downloaded from this domain, the size is 37,888 bytes, Kaspersky detects it as Trojan-Downloader.Win32.Baser.w.
      • This trojan-downloader can download 20 trojans from ganbibi.com.
      • We suggest everyone could block this two domains "nmmmn.com","ganbibi.com".
    • The CISRT website is used for reporting any malicious Internet activities like Trojans and viruses.
  • Democrats kill proposal for permanent Net tax relief
    • A key U.S. House of Representatives panel on Wednesday unanimously agreed to extend a ban on Internet access taxes for another four years–but not before rejecting proposals to make the tax permanent or extend it for a lengthier stretch of time.
    • At issue is a law dating back to 1998 that generally prohibits state and local governments from taxing Internet access, including DSL (digital subscriber line), cable modem and BlackBerry-type wireless transmission services.
    • It also prohibits "discriminatory" taxes that treat products sold on the Internet differently than those in brick-and-mortar stores, but it does not deal with the separate issue of imposing sales taxes on goods bought online.
    • The current law is set to expire November 1, and Republicans have complained that their Democratic colleagues are moving too sluggishly to renew the expiring rules.
    • At Wednesday’s House Judiciary Committee debate, Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) proposed a series of amendments attempting to make the prohibition more lasting–first a permanent ban, then an eight-year extension, then a six-year one.
    • One by one, the politicians present shot down the amendments.