Show of 7-7-2007

  • Email Questions
  • Dear Tech Talk. What is the difference between Wi-Max and Wi-Fi? Arnie
    • WiMAX is defined as Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access
    • Managed by the WiMAX Forum (http://www.wimaxforum.org)
    • Based on IEEE 802.16 standard, officially known as WirelessMAN
    • Provides wireless data over long distances, in a variety of different ways, from point to point links to full mobile cellular type access.
    • The Forum describes WiMAX as "a standards-based technology enabling the delivery of last mile wireless broadband access as an alternative to cable and DSL.”
    • WiMAX is a long range system, covering many kilometers that uses licensed or unlicensed spectrum to deliver a point-to-point connection to the Internet from an ISP to an end user.
      • Suitable for connecting Wi-Fi hotspots with each other and to other parts of the Internet.
      • Providing a backup source of Internet connectivity as part of a business continuity plan.
    • Wi-Fi is a LAN and WiMax is a MAN
  • Profiles in IT – Fathers of the Internet
    • Vint Cerf and Bob Kahn
    • The first wide area network was the ARPANET (proposed in 1967). Its goal was to connect various mainframe computers for the purpose of time sharing resources.
    • In the early seventies, the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) developed two other packet switched technologies, one for synchronous satellites (SATNET) and the other for ground-based packet radio (PRNET).
    • Neither of these networks could communicate through the ARPANET.
    • Kahn’s decision to link these networks as separate and independent networks resulted in the creation of new internetworking technologies.
    • Kahn collaborated with Cerf on both the protocols and the architecture of this Internetworking project.
    • Out of this collaboration was borne Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) and ultimately the Internet.
    • This protocol would be divided into two software "layers," with TCP in charge of connection management and reliability and IP in charge of packet delivery.
    • DARPA contracted with Cerf’s group to develop the initial protocol design, with BBN and University of London to build implementations of the protocol.
    • This program connected ARPANET, SATNET, and PRNET.
    • The ARPANET was converted to TCP/IP as it standard protocol on January 1, 1983.
    • In the mid 1980s, the National Science Foundation (NSF) commissioned a high performance network based on TCP/IP internetworking architecture of the ARPANET.
    • This network would not be used or commercial purposes.
    • In 1995, NSF ceased its support for the NSFNET. The Internet, as we know it today, was born.
    • The Internet, in its current configuration, is global and not controlled by any country, but rather by an elected group within ISOC.
    • The Internet is supported by the fees that individuals pay to their Internet Service Provider (ISP).
    • The ISPs pay for their usage of the Internet backbone, which is operated by the Telcos
    • It works because everyone voluntarily supports the standards defined by Internet Engineering Task Force, which is run by the non-profit Internet Society which was founded by Cerf and Kahn..
  • iPhone Battery Woes
    • The iPhone’s battery is apparently soldered inside the device
    • It cannot be swapped out by the owner like most other cell phones.
    • The company posted the battery replacement details on its Web site last Friday after the product went on sale.
    • Users would have to submit their iPhone to Apple for battery service.
    • The service will cost users $79, plus $6.95 for shipping, and will take three business days.
    • Apple is also offering a loaner iPhone for $29 while the gadget is under repair.
  • UK Firm To Unlock iPhone
    • Uniquephones software engineers were working "around the clock" in order to bypass Apple’s restriction that ties activation of the iPhone to signing up to a two-year contract with AT&T.
    • Uniquephones said it is "almost ready" to release a public beta of iPhone unlocking software.
    • It claims the pre-release technology is already able to unlock 75 per cent of all the iPhones it has tested using unlock codes generated from the phones’ IMEI (International Mobile Equipment Identity) numbers.
    • Uniquephones plans to sell software designed to unlock iPhones for around $50, far more than it charges to unlock other mobile devices.
    • Last year, the US copyright office ruled that it was legal for consumers to unlock their mobile phones in order to use them with other carriers.
  • iPhone Sensors May Be Useful
    • The iPhone has three tiny sensors–an accelerometer, an ambient light sensor, and an infrared sensor.
    • Apple uses these sensors for:
      • detecting when to convert the screen view from portrait to landscape
      • adjusting the brightness of the screen based on the brightness of the environment
      • disabling the touch screen when a person holds the phone to her ear
    • . A sensor-enabled phone could feasibly help monitor your exercise habits, keep track of an elderly relative’s activities, and let your friends and family know if you’re available for a call or instant-messaging conversation.
  • Hot Fuel Contains Less Energy than Cold Fuel
    • Gasoline expands as temperatures rise. That means motorists get less energy from a gallon of so-called "hot fuel" than from a cold one.
    • Hundreds of consumers in more than a dozen states who are suing oil companies and gas retailers. The lawsuits allege that higher temperatures of gasoline cost consumers between 3 and 9 cents a gallon extra at the pump.
    • The litigation seeks to force the oil industry to install gas pumps that have temperature-compensation equipment.
    • The consumers’ attorneys say that in Canada temperature-adjustment equipment already has been installed at the gas pump.
    • My Calculation
      • Volumetric Coefficient of Thermal Expansion: 950×10-6 [1/T(Celsius)]
      • Delta T = (90-60)F = 30 F (or 16.66 C)
      • Cost per Gallon = $3.00
      • Over charge is 4.75 cents per gallon
    • However, gas is stored in underground tanks (20 feet deep) and there is almost no temperature fluctuation.
  • Mechanical Computer Update
    • Assembly Nearly Complete
    • Should be operational by next show
    • Great project to learn about how computer actually work
  • Three Charged with Using Internet to Incite Terrorism
    • Three Muslim men, believed to be closely linked to al-Qaida, have pleaded guilty in London to using the Internet to incite terrorism.
    • Authorities say Younes Tsouli, Waseem Mughal and Tariq al-Daour pleaded guilty to charges of inciting acts of terrorism wholly or partly outside Britain via Web sites that encouraged the killing of non-Muslims.
    • Police say the three men financed their activities using stolen credit cards.
    • Officials say they believe the case is the first time in Britain that anyone has been convicted on such charges. The three changed their not-guilty pleas several months into their trial.
    • Authorities said they found manuals for putting together car bombs and suicide vests in the possession of the three men
  • The Net-Centric Operations of Terrorist Groups Today
    • Analysis by Jeffrey Carr
    • A recent study by the Artificial Intelligence Lab of the University of Arizona details precisely how these net-savvy terrorists are using the Web for fund-raising, recruitment, propaganda, logistical support, communications, training, and even cyber warfare.
    • The Pentagon has recently announced that it monitors over 5,000 jihadist sites and keeps a close watch on the top 100 most active and hostile.
    • The European Union launched its “Check the Web” portal in May, 2007, which is a Europol (European Police) resource that all 27 member states can contribute intelligence to.
    • In spite of these efforts, and those conducted by the U.S. Intelligence Community, there are a number of obstacles that confound our ability to find, capture, and evaluate this data
  • Mapping the Electronic Jihad Using Alexa.com
  • Web site: http://www.alexa.com
    • Analysis performed using alexa.com shows that the bulk of visits to jihadi websites come from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA).
    • At least forty countries on every inhabited continent have some representation in this truly global virtual community.
    • In an analysis of 10 of the most influential and important jihadi web forums showed the following data
      • 78.1 Middle East and North Africa
      • 5.9% North and South America
      • 4.8% Europe
      • 1.4% East Asia
      • 1.5% South Asia ( Pakistan)
      • 1.0% Australia
      • 7.3% Data Unavailable
  • Setting Up Wi-Fi Internet Cam
    • Required equipment (Wi-Fi camera, Wi-Fi router, Internet access)
    • D-Link has cameras from $100 to over $1000
    • Linksys Low Resolution Camera
      • 320×240
      • $100
    • Linksys Higher Resolution Cam
      • 640X480
      • Pan, Zoom, Tilt (PZT)
      • Sound and Motion Detection
      • $300
    • Camera should have a built in web page which can be accessed directly by browser.
    • For viewing over the Internet, you must open a port in the firewall
      • If you open port –XXXX (>1024)
      • If your IP address is — 68.128.12.92
      • Your cameras address will be – 68.128.12.92:XXXX
    • Can configure systems to send email with video clip if motion is detected.
    • Can view Internet camera with PC, cell phone, or PDA.
  • Google Image Labeler
    • Web Address: http://images.google.com/imagelabeler/
    • Label random images to help improve the quality of Google’s image search results.
    • You are randomly paired with a partner who’s online and using the feature.
    • Over a two-minute period, you and your partner will be shown the same set of images and asked to provide as many labels as possible to describe each image you see.
    • When your label matches your partner’s label, you’ll earn points depending on how specific your label is.
    • You’ll be shown more images until time runs out.
    • After time expires, you can explore the images you’ve seen and the websites where those images were found.
    • You are shown the points you’ve earned throughout the session
  • Google Moves into Lobbying
    • In 2005, when the network neutrality battle began, Google was spending just a few hundred thousand dollars on lobbying and had a skeleton policy crew.
    • This was compared to the tens of millions being spent by companies like AT&T and Verizon, who’ve over decades developed a vast and very effective public policy machine.
    • Now it’s Google’s turn to build a lobby, tackling everything from network neutrality to anti-community broadband bills (they want to be able to sell local search tools to cities and towns that deploy Wi-Fi).
    • Google has picked technology-law expert and Washington veteran Alan Davidson to help win friends and influence people on Capitol Hill.
    • While many of its new ventures have wowed consumers, they’ve brought Google into conflict with old-media stalwarts and telecom behemoths alike.
      • Print for Libraries, a plan to scan and index millions of the world’s library books, has publishers fuming.
      • Internet-calling service Google Talk and a plan to provide Wi-Fi for San Francisco threatens to tread on turf dominated by the phone carriers
      • Privacy advocates have raised concerns about how Google tracks and stores search data.
    • A Massachusetts Institute of Technology-trained computer scientist and graduate of Yale Law School, Davidson served for eight years as associate director of the Center for Democracy & Technology, a nonprofit think tank and initiative group that opposes government and industry control of the Internet, while advocating user privacy.
    • Google says it will focus on three major categories: Copyrights and fair-use policy, intermediary liability, and "Net neutrality."
    • While Google may still like to cultivate the image as a startup, it’s beginning to act like the $80 billion industry heavyweight it really is.
  • Intel releases BIOS patch Core 2 and Xeon 3000/5000 chips
    • Addresses potential unpredictable system behavior.
    • The update is recommended for users running an Intel Core2 Duo E4000 and E6000, Intel Core2 Quad Q6600, Intel Core2 Extreme X6800 and QX6700, Dual-COre Intel Xeon 5100 and Quad-Core Intel Xeon 5300.
    • HP lists the "microcode reliability update" as a critical fix that can "leave a workstation in an unstable condition
    • Could potentially result in system lockups or failures, or data corruption."
    • Symptoms include mouse and keyboard failure, Windows Blue Screen of Death, and Linux generating a kernel panic.
    • While news of the patch has circulated suggesting catastrophic importance, Intel said the probability of encountering an issue is low, and has not been reported in any commercial situations or real-world environments.