Show of 6-16-2007

  • Email Questions
    • Dr. Richard Shurtz, Here is an article on Operation Bot Roast. What is your take on this? Arnie
  • Operation Bot Roast
    • Operation Bot Roast tracked up more than one million individually identifiable computers known to be part of one bot net or another.
    • The law enforcement organization said that part of the operation involved notifying people who owned PCs it knew were part of zombie or bot networks.
    • The majority of victims are not even aware that their computer has been compromised or their personal information exploited.
    • Many people fall victim by opening an attachment on an e-mail message containing a virus or by visiting a booby-trapped web page.
    • Those in charge of botnets are called botherders and can have tens of thousands of machines under their control.
    • Operation Bot Roast has resulted in the arrest of three people known to have used bot nets for criminal ends.
    • FBI urged PC users to practice good computer security which includes using regularly updated anti-virus software and installing a firewall.
    • For those without basic protections anti-virus, companies such as F Secure, Trend Micro, Kaspersky Labs and many others offer online scanning services that can help spot infections.
    • Telltale signs could be if the machine ran slowly, had an e-mail outbox full of mail a user did not send or they get e-mail saying they are sending spam.
  • Robert Soloway (Spam King) Arrested by FBI
    • Robert Soloway, accused of being the "Spam King," made more than $1 million over four years by sending millions of pieces of spam for a business he said he started when he was 16
    • Arrest was part of operation Bot Roast
    • Newly released court documents show that investigators believe that Soloway, 27, who has long been reviled by international anti-spam groups, sent more than 90 million e-mails in three months, through just two of the servers he used.
    • With three other servers connected to him, investigators believe he sent 120 million e-mails to nearly 80,000 addresses.
    • He used a controversial software called Dark Mailer, which investigators say lets users tap into a network of zombie proxy computers to send bulk e-mails with near-total anonymity.
    • Those details arise from affidavits for search warrants executed Wednesday, when Soloway was arrested on a 35-count federal indictment accusing him of fraud, money laundering and identity theft. Jail time could be as high as 65 years.
    • The affidavits also revealed details about Soloway’s financial activities. They reported that spamming was his primary source of income and that he made $1.6 million from 2003 through 2006.
  • Profiles in IT
    • Federico Faggin, Ted Hoff, and Stan Mazor, Intel engineers, created the first programmable CPU (4004) in conjunction with Masatoshi Shima, BUSICOM engineer, who provided the calculator design requirements.
    • Intel to introduce the 4004 to the general market in November 1971.
      • Microprocessor measured 1/8th by 1/6th of an inch—the size of a fingernail
      • It delivered the same computing power as the first electronic computer, the ENIAC, built in 1946, which filled an entire room and used 18,000 vacuum tubes.
      • It has 2,300 transistors when it was introduced in 1971
      • Intel® Core2 Duo processors contain over 291 million transistors.
      • The 4004 chip circuit line width was 10 microns or 10,000 nanometers.
      • Intel chips now have line widths of .065 microns or 65 nanometers.
      • A nanometer is one billionth of a meter. By comparison, a human hair is approximately 100 microns or 100,000 nanometers.
      • The Intel 4004 microprocessor was produced on 2" wafers initially and then on 3" wafers.
      • Today’s microprocessors are produced on 12" or 300mm wafers.
      • The 4004 microprocessor is composed of 5 layers.
    • Busicom, a subsidiary of Nippon, renounced the exclusive rights for the 4-bit 4004 microprocessor for a better price. Agreement was signed by Robert :Noyce, Intel, and Mr. Yoshio Kojima, Busicom and Nippon.
    • In April 1972, Intel released the 8008, which could process data in 8-bit chunks. It was designed by Faggin and Hal Feeney.
      • The 8008 chip was designed for Datapoint, a terminal manufacturer in Texas that couldn’t pay for it at the end of the contract.
      • To settle, Datapoint granted Intel the rights to the chip, including the instruction set, which Datapoint developed.
      • The instruction set eventually became part of the basis for the X86 architecture behind Intel chips today.
      • Number of transistors: 3,500
    • In 1974, Intel introduced the 8080 processor.
      • It included a more complex instruction set
      • It came in a package with 40 pins
      • It included 6,000 transistors
    • IBM selected the Intel 8088 for the first PC in 1981.
      • Number of transistors: 29,000
      • Speed: 5, 8, 10 MHz
      • That sealed the deal for Intel and their market dominance.
  • Digicomp Mechanical Computer
    • Website: http://www.mindsontoys.com/
    • Digicomp I V2 ($58)
    • Based on Digicomp I V1 which was sold in 1963
    • Digital Computer I V1 originally sold of $5.95
    • My computer came in, but I have not had time to build it.
  • Nanolaser Lasers Output Can Be Tuned to Many Colors
    • Lasers in today’s electronics generally come in red—in everything from DVD players to bar-code scanners
    • The result uses nanocrystals for the basic laser material. As the size shrinks the effective bandgap of the material shifts.
    • The band gap, or difference in energy between conduction and valence electrons, determines the wavelength of light emitted. "
    • In nanocrystals, the gap changes with their size—the smaller the size, the larger the gap," says physicist Victor Klimov of Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico
    • They developed a two layer nanocrystal (cadmium sulfide core and a zinc selenide shell) which trapped excited electrons long enough to be optically pumped for lasing.
  • International Space Station News
    • Russian computers fail after installation of new solar panel by US astronauts.
    • Power surges in the input circuitry during solar panel installation are blamed for failure.
    • Six computer stopped working.
    • The Russian computers that control oxygen and water supplies for the three-member crew of the orbiting station, as well as its stability
    • Four are working now after technicians bypassed the main power switch.
    • Lots of figure pointed going on now. Whose fault is it: US or Russia?
  • WEP Compromised Even Further
    • Researchers have discovered a new way of attacking Wired Equivalent Privacy
    • Erik Tews, Ralf-Philipp Weinmann and Andrei Pyshkin, Darmstadt University of Technology in Darmstadt, Germany.
    • Breaking 104 bit WEP in less than 60 seconds.
    • 40,000 data packets are needed for a 50 percent chance of success
    • 85,000 packets give a 95 percent chance of success
    • What’s new that a Wi-Fi attacker no longer needs long periods of time nor much smarts.
    • The protocol, which is part of the IEEE 802.11 wireless networking standard, was superseded by WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) in 2003, then by WPA2, another name for the full IEEE 802.11i standard.
  • War Driving Equipment
    • Netstumbler
    • Cantenna
    • 802.11b Orinoco Gold Classic Wi-Fi card manufactured by Proxim