Show of 2-14-2004

  • Windows Code Released on Internet
    • Souce code leaked last Thursday leading to a file-swapping frenzy
    • Dated July 25, 2000, source code represents Windows 2000 Service Pack 1
      • Leaked code include 30,915 files
      • Included 13.5 million lines of code
    • Window NT breach
      • 95,103 files
      • 28 million likes of code
    • Chunks of code were riddled with hidden notes and profanity
    • Mix of assembler, C, and C++
    • A mixture of running code and junk.
    • BetaNews.com reported leak Traced Back to Mainsoft
      • Core dump revealed Linux OS used by Mainsoft
      • Most likely traced to machine used by Mainsoft?s Director of Technology, Eyal Alaluf
      • He is probably not the one who leaked the code. Audit trail to easily established
      • Mainsoft is a ?software porting? company, specializing in Porting Windows Applications to a Unix environment
      • One of two partners under the Windows Interface Source Environment (WISE)
    • Under the Shared Source Initiative, 127 university and companies have access to the code
  • FCC Formally Considers Regulating Voice over IP
    • Majority of commissioners favor minimal regulation
    • This is good for consumers….expect the competition to heat up and prices to drop
    • FCC VoIP Page explains the technology to consumers
  • 2004 Government Tech Investment
    • According to Washington Technology
    • Smart Cards ? Green Light
      • DOD issues 10,000 to 14,000 per day
      • Patent, Trademark, IRS, Agriculture all use them
      • Downside: lack of interagency standards
      • Outlook: DOD developing an identity management system that will permit authentication across several agencies and vendors
    • Web Services ? Green Light
      • Integration is? high on the list (Federal Enterprise Architecture Initiative)
      • Downside: Standards up in the air (J2EE or .Net still undecided)
      • Outlook: Standards will forced decisions in 2004
    • Voice over IP ? Yellow Light
      • Some agencies have rolled out VoIP service to save dollars (Commerce)
      • Reliability still an issue
      • Conventional phone service getting cheaper, very reliable
      • New offices are good candidates
    • Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) ? Yellow Light
      • DOD wants RFID for its logistics chain (just like WalMart)
      • Agriculture has another candidate for RFID: cattle
      • Prices coming down (now about 20 cents a chip) helped by WalMart?s 2005 deployment date
      • Downside: No real traction outside of DOD
    • Wireless ? Red Light
      • Benefits are fantastic.
      • Technology is maturing quickly, spurred by widespread consumer acceptance
      • Security remains top concerns
      • NIST?s report was pretty negative until better security can be embedded
    • Biometrics ? Red Light
      • Technology not mature. Not ready for heavy use
      • Biometrics standards are still a dream
      • Not much traction outside of defense, intelligence, and law enforcement.
  • Outsourcing War
    • Congress is on the war path, elections are approaching
    • Last month, Congress passed legislation that banned Federal agencies from sending work overseas
    • Want to take action to stem the loss of Business Process Operations (BPO) to India
      • Indian BPO should grow to $12 billion by 2006
      • Fortune 100s will move 2 million jobs to India by 2008
      • 851,000 from the US
    • Indian BPO Industry cries foul, saying that its software market is open
  • WebSites of the Week
    • Website: www.technorati.com
      • Technorati is a conversation engine.
      • It tells you what’s being said, right now, about every blog or site that has something to say — and says it so well that others point to them.
        • 1,686,641 weblogs watched.
        • 87,384,391 active links.
        • 230,703,374 links tracked
      • Sections Include: Search, Top 100, Recent BlogsNewcomers, Current Events, Breaking News, Watchlists
    • Website : www.dodgeball.com
      • Text messaging service for mobile phones to track your buddies and their location
      • Circles: Use your mobile phone to tell us where you are and we’ll broadcast your whereabouts to all your friends.
      • Guide: Use your mobile phone to look up addresses and cross-streets or find the closest pool table or Ms. Pac Man machine
      • Scout: Use your mobile phone to broadcast messages to people within 10 blocks of your current location
  • O?Reilly Emerging Technology Conference
    • February 9-12, 2004 in San Diego
    • O?Reilly?s chance to listen to the Alpha Geeks
    • This conference is a good barometer of software development trends
    • Digital Democracy Teach-In (Joe Trippi)
      • Social software enabled Howard Dean
      • Social software could not save the campaign and mobilize supporters
    • Track One: Interfaces and Services
      • We spend more time staring with mobile laptops, palmtops, and hiptops.
      • We’re moving to lighter-weight, componentized, flexible interfaces.
      • We?re reconsidering the browser interface, and discovering what happens when you turn web pages back into their underlying applications and data.
    • Track 2: Social Software
      • Software designed to support the interactions of groups of people. Friendster, Technorati, LinkedIn, and FOAF (friend-of-a-friend networks)
      • Silly experiments like Flash Mobs and serious ones, like Howard Dean’s use of MeetUp for his presidential campaign.
      • This is the track with the most papers and the most energy….read these papers
      • Tech Talk’s websites of the week came from this category
    • Track 3: Untethered
      • Cellular telephone users disperse and gather dynamically as they transmit short notes billions of times a month.
      • Devices on desktops, in pockets, and built into cars loosely couple via Bluetooth into a personal area network.
    • Track 4: Location
      • GPS technology, from handheld receivers to automobiles and cell phones, enables us to fix events in space just as easily as we can in time.
      • Suddenly, everyone can be both a producer and consumer of geographic information and location-based services.
      • Yet hidden in this seeming utopia of location-based services lie yet-to-be addressed questions about privacy and security.
    • Track 5: Hardware
      • Hardware hacks expand the machine in new and powerful ways
      • Arrays of sensors and RFID tags are connecting and interacting
      • What are the future apps and implications of sub-micro computing?
    • Track 6:Business Models
      • We feature a range of technologies that are growing just below the horizon of commercial viability
      • Place a spotlight on projects and people who are likely to become very important to the future of Internet computing
      • Equally important is a careful study of what the new business models will look like.
      • Will they be a return to the traditional, times being as they are? Or is there room to innovate? Who is putting a stake in the ground and attempting to build the new applications, network, and online culture?
  • Stratford News
    • Stratford Website Continues to Improve
    • Academics
      • Masters, Bachelors, Associates
    • Professional Development
      • Technical, Business, Event Management
    • Remote Lab and Online Courses
    • Tech Talk Home Page
    • Fine Dining
    • Culinary Workshops